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Save The Date - BSMPG 2014

BSMPG 2014

"Ladies and gentlemen, can I please have your attention. I've just been handed an urgent and horrifying news story. I need all of you, to stop what you're doing and listen."

 

BSMPG is proud to announce May 16-18th, 2014 as the date for our annual seminar!

 

 

BSMPG: Where Leaders Learn

Lateral Foot and Ankle Pain? Check the Cuboid

 

by Art Horne

 

cuboid

 

When treating the common ankle sprain, clinicians should be aware of a not so common treatment approach when faced with recurrent lateral foot and ankle pain.

 

“Medical professionals must be aware that any lateral foot and ankle pain may be the result of cuboid syndrome. Once properly diagnosed, cuboid syndrome responds exceptionally well to conservative treatment involving specific cuboid manipulation techniques. Other methods of conservative treatment including therapeutic modalities, therapeutic exercises, padding, and low dye taping techniques are used as adjuncts in the treatment of this syndrome. Immediately after the manipulation is performed, the patient may note a decrease or a complete cessation of their symptoms. Occasionally, if the patient has had symptoms for a longer duration, several manipulations may be warranted throughout the course of time. Due to the fact radiographic imaging is of little value, the diagnosis is largely based on the patient’s history and a collection of signs and symptoms associated with the condition. Additionally, an understanding of the etiology behind this syndrome is essential, aiding the clinician in the diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. After the correct diagnosis is made and a proper treatment regimen is utilized, the prognosis is excellent.

Introduction

            Cuboid syndrome has also been noted as a complication of a plantar flexion and inversion ankle injuries. Inversion ankle sprains are one of the most common athletic injuries, accounting for between 38% and 45% of all injures. Up to 40% of these patients may have residual symptoms, cuboid syndrome being a possible culprit.”

-          Patterson 2006

Clinical Findings

            “The symptoms of cuboid syndrome resemble those of a ligament sprain. Pain is often diffuse along the lateral foot between the CC joint and the fourth and/or fifth cuboid-metatarsal joints and may radiate throughout the foot. A slight sulcus over the dorsum of the cuboid and/or a slight prominence of fullness of the plantar surface may be present with subluxation along with erythema, edema, and/or ecchymosis.

            Cuboid syndrome may be misdiagnosed as a lateral ankle sprain or overlooked when it develops in conjunction with a lateral ankle injury. “

-Durell, 2007

Signs and Symptoms

            Presenting complaints are sharp pain localized at the lateral aspect of the foot at the level of the calcaneal cuboid joint. The pain can occasionally occur at the cuboid-fourth and fifth metatarsal articulations, and infrequently along the cuboid-lateral cuneiform/cuboid-navicular articulations. The patient relates that following the precipitating injury, the pain is either gradual or rapid often becoming a chronic “inability to work through” the injury. There is continued pain primarily during the propulsive phase of gait which impairs walking, and can become disabling. Eventually, the symptoms can be difficult to diagnose because of referred pain and generalized foot pain.

-          Zirm 1995

Treatment

            “The “cuboid whip” was originally introduced by Newell and Woodle in 1981. Marshall modified the procedure in 1988 and named it the “cuboid squeeze.” Both are similar maneuvers that require the surrounding musculature be relaxed, introducing the long extensor as well as the peroneal tendons.

            The cuboid squeeze and the cuboid whip are performed with the patient in the prone position, with a slightly flexed knee. An alternative is standing in the “horse-shoeing” position with the patient braced against a wall or chair. The patient’s entire lower extremity must be fully relaxed. The examiner manipulates the foot and ankle into plantarflexion. The physician is facing the plantar aspect of the foot with thumbs on the medial plantar surface of the cuboid and fingers stabilizing the dorsal aspect of the foot, avoiding the dorsal aspect of the cuboid. When the physician feels the soft tissues relax, a small excursion, high velocity thrust is then directed dorsally at a 60 degree lateral angulation. The cuboid whip uses a more dramatic arc of motion than the more gradual, definitive cuboid squeeze. The squeeze maneuver allows the physician to feel the soft tissues relax, and relocate the cuboid in a controlled fashion. The cuboid squeeze appears to be more effective than the cuboid whip. Forces are better controlled and the intensity is better directed. The whip technique transmits forces to the anterior ankle joint and can result in damage to the soft tissue structures, such as the peroneal nerves where they cross the ankle.

            An alternative technique can be used if the initial manipulation is unsuccessful. Performed with the patient supine, the physician stands at the base of the patient’s feet and grasps the fourth and fifth metatarsals, while allowing gravity and the weight of the leg to distract the cuboid articulations. After muscle relaxation is obtained, the metatarsals are pulled in a longitudinal direction with the forefoot in slight plantarflexion. This maneuver is also useful in relocating the subluxated cuboid metatarsal bases. This is accomplished with the fingers exerting a force in the plantar direction to the dorsal aspect of the metatarsal bases as the thumbs press dorsally at the plantar aspect of the involved metatarsal head(s).”

-Zirm, 1997

 

When evaluating your traditional lateral ankle sprain it's worth thinking about some sound advice my father used to tell me, “measure twice, cut once”.  Evaluating for bony malposition in the talus, fibula and cuboid upon initial evaluation will save you and your patient a considerable amount of recovery time and potential frustration down the road.

 

Join attendees from across the United States, Canada and Europe who have already signed up for the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar and learn from the Leaders in Sports Medicine and Performance.  Your patients and clients will thank you!

 

 


Your Anatomy Teacher Was Wrong - Again!

 

If you were the average student in the average anatomy class, you were taught that the psoas major was responsible for hip flexion and external rotation of the femur.  If you were lucky, you may have had a minor discussion regarding its role in lumbar stability.  

But did your anatomy teacher discuss the psoas as it relates to the diaphram and breathing? What about the psoas and the pelvic floor?

No?

I didn't think so.

Let's take a quick look at what you may have been missing...

 

 

Psoas

"The fascial relations of the psoas major to the surrounding tissues warrant special attention as these links influence the biomechanics of these interlaced structures. The medial arcuate ligament is a continuation of the superior psoas fascia that continues superiorly to the diaphragm. The right and left crus constitute the spinal attachment of the diaphragm. They attach to the anterolateral component of the upper three lumbar vertebral bodies. The crus and their fascia overlap the psoas major and appear to be continuous with this muscle until they come more anterior and blend with the anterior longitudinal ligament. (8) As the psoas descends, its inferomedial fascia becomes thick at its inferior portion and is continuous with the pelvic floor fascia. (9) This forms a link with the conjoint tendon, transverse abdominus, and the internal oblique. (10) As the psoas major courses over the pelvic brim, the fascia of the posterior fascicles attach firmly to the pelvic brim."

 

Psoas major: a case report and review of its anatomy, biomechanics, and clinical implications by Sajko, Sandy & Stuber, Kent. Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association, 2009.

 

Discover what you've been missing and what the leaders in Sports Medicine and Performance already know at the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 17 & 18, 2013 in Boston.

 



Training = Rehab, Rehab = Training

BSMPG is proud to announce the addition of Charlie Weingroff as a speaker within the Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Track at the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 17th and 18th, 2013!  Charlie joins Robert Butler, Dr. Alex Vasquez, and Bill Knowles along with keynote speakers, Dr. Stuart McGill, Marco Cardinale, Fergus Connolly, Adriaan Louw and Marvin Chun for this weekend event.  With the most thorough and integrated speaker line-up ever assembled, the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar will be the WORLD'S most sought after Sports Medicine & Performance Seminar to date!!

We are expecting the largest crowd in the history of BSMPG events with speakers and attendees traveling the globe to be in Boston in May of 2013, and thus have already made plans to move our main lecture hall to a newly renovated multi-tier auditorium.

Be sure to save the date now - hotels will fill fast with this event along with normal Boston traffic so start making plans now!

See you in Boston next May!!!

 

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charlie weingroff

 

CHARLIE WEINGROFF, DPT, ATC, CSCS

Topic: Neurodevelopmental Sequence and Rehab/Training

 

Charlie is a Doctor of Physical Therapy, a Certified Athletic Trainer, and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  He was most recently the Director of Physical Performance and Resiliency and Lead Physical Therapist for the United States Marines Corps Special Operations Command in Camp Lejeune, NC.  He is also Director of Clinical Education for the Vibraflex Whole-Body Vibration and Andante Medical, the makers of the SmartStep, mobile force plate.  He graduated from Ursinus College with a degree in Exercise and Sports Science in 1996, and went on to earn an MSPT in 1999 and DPT in 2010 from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.

Prior to returning to his home state of New Jersey in the Fall of 2006 after 12 seasons of professional basketball, he was the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach and Assistant Athletic Trainer for the Philadelphia 76ers in the NBA.   Among the highlights of his tenure in Philadelphia was being part of the medical staff that ranked 1st in the NBA in Player Missed Games in the 2005-06 season.

Through rehabbing patients, he subscribes to a movement-based approach popularized by the works of Dr. Vladimir Janda, Dr. Shirley Sahrmann, Dr. Stuart McGill, and Gray Cook.  In training athletes and clients, he champions the principles of the Functional Movement Screen and sound, evidence-based training principles.  Some of the methodologies Charlie is formally trained in include DNS, ART, Dry Needling, Graston, FMS/SFMA, and the RKC.

Aside from working with patients, athletes and clients, he is also under the bar himself.  In 2007, he achieved AAPF Elite status in the 220 weight class with a total of 1915 pounds. His best powerlifting competition total is 800 squat, 510 bench press and 605 deadlift.

Currently Charlie is training and rehabbing clients of all types at Drive495 in Manhattan, NYC and Fit For Life in Marlboro, NJ.

Charlie lives with his wife, Kristen, and dog, Rumble, in NJ.

The Man That Wants To Kill Crunches

 

Dr. Stuart McGill  

After three decades of figuring how out the spine works, Stuart McGill has come to loathe sit-ups. It doesn’t matter whether they are the full sit-ups beloved by military trainers or the crunch versions so ubiquitous in gyms. “What happens when you perform a sit-up?” he asks. “The spine is flexed into the position at which it damages sooner.”

The professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo knows a thing or two about snapping spines. In his lab, McGill proudly shows off a machine that’s probably created more disc herniations than any other in the world. “We get real [pig] spines from the butcher and we compress them, shear them and bend them to simulate activities such as golf swings and sit-ups, and watch as unique patterns of injury emerge.” A disc has a ring around it, and the middle, the nucleus, is filled with a mucus-like liquid. Do a sit-up and the spine’s compression will squeeze the nucleus. On his computer, McGill shows how the nucleus can work its way out of the disc, hit a nerve root and cause that oh-so-familiar back pain. “From observing the way your total gym routine is performed, we can predict the type of disc damage you’re eventually going to have.”

 

While there are lots of ways to injure a back, the sit-up is an easily preventable one. According to his research, a crunch or traditional sit-up generates at least 3,350 newtons (the equivalent of 340 kg) of compressive force on the spine. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health states that anything above 3,300 newtons is unsafe.

So McGill suggests replacing sit-ups with exercises to strengthen the core while not bending the spine: 

Continue to read this article by clicking HERE  

 

Want more awesome McGill resources? Visit Craig Liebenson's site for a complete list of audio, video, and written articles outlining the most up-to-date research on athletic performance and core development.

 

Learn why crunches are hurting your back and why your traditional core exercises are missing the mark when it comes to improving athletic performance at the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar featuring Professor Stuart McGill as keynote speaker!

Hurry - this seminar will sell out again this year.  Discounted prices end December 31st, 2012!

 

 

Moneyball and BSMPG Summer Seminar - This is one Lecture you DON'T want to miss!

BSMPG is proud to announce the addition of Bobby Alejo as a speaker within the Sports Fusion Track at the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 17th and 18th, 2013!  Bobby joins legendary track coach Randall Huntingon and Ben Prentiss along with keynote speakers, Dr. Stuart McGill, Marco Cardinale, Fergus Connolly, Adriaan Louw and Marvin Chun for this weekend event.  With the most thorough and integrated speaker line-up ever assembled, the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar will be the WORLD'S most sought after Sports Medicine & Performance Seminar to date!!

We are expecting the largest crowd in the history of BSMPG events with speakers and attendees traveling the globe to be in Boston in May of 2013, and thus have already made plans to move our main lecture hall to a newly renovated multi-tier auditorium.

Be sure to save the date now - hotels will fill fast with this event along with normal Boston traffic so start making plans now!

See you in Boston next May!!!

 

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Bobby Alejo

BOBBY ALEJO

North Carolina State Wolfpack

Assistant Athletics Director for Strength and Conditioning Bob Alejo oversees all of the strength and conditioning efforts of the department, and coordinates the day-to-day efforts of the men's basketball team.

Prior to joining the Wolfpack staff in April, Alejo served as the Director of Strength and Conditioning for the Oakland A's, a position he also held from 1993-2001. In that role, he was responsible for all aspects of the organization's year-round physical preparation at both the major league and minor league levels. 

Prior to rejoining the A's, Alejo was the Director of Strength and Conditioning at UC Santa Barbara from 2005-2008. During that time he was also a member of the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team as strength and conditioning coach for the Gold medal-winning men's beach volleyball team of Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser. 

 

Even this guy is excited that Bobby is speaking at BSMPG!!


Moneyball and BSMPG

 

Registration is now open - Register before the New Year and receive a discounted Price!

 

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Hockey Athletic Development - Can't Miss Speaker

BSMPG is proud to announce the addition of Kevin Neeld as a speaker within the Sports Fusion Track at the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 17th and 18th, 2013!  Kevin joins legendary track coach Randall Huntingon and Ben Prentiss along with keynote speakers, Dr. Stuart McGill, Marco Cardinale, Fergus Connolly, Adriaan Louw and Marvin Chun for this weekend event.  With the most thorough and integrated speaker line-up ever assembled, the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar will be the WORLD'S most sought after Sports Medicine & Performance Seminar to date!!

We are expecting the largest crowd in the history of BSMPG events with speakers and attendees traveling the globe to be in Boston in May of 2013, and thus have already made plans to move our main lecture hall to a newly renovated multi-tier auditorium.

Be sure to save the date now - hotels will fill fast with this event along with normal Boston traffic so start making plans now!

See you in Boston next May!!!

 

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Kevin Neeld

KEVIN NEELD

Sponsored by:

 

Hockey Strength Training


Director of Athletic Development & Athletic Development Coach

Kevin Neeld is the President, COO, and Director of Athletic Development at Endeavor. Since joining the team in 2007 as Endeavor’s Director of Athletic Development, Kevin has rapidly established himself as an international authority on athletic development, with a reputation for creatively applying an extensive knowledge in functional anatomy, biomechanics, neural control, and injury prevention to produce superior results for his athletes.

Kevin is sought after for his expertise in both performance enhancement and injury resistance. He has helped athletes surpass previous performance bests following a multitude of common athletic injuries, including ankle sprains, knee ligament tears, hip labral tears, chronic groin and hip flexor strains, sports hernias, low back pain, shoulder dislocations/separations, and shoulder labral tears.

After completing a successful college hockey career at the University of Delaware ('05-'06: MVP; '06-'07: Team Captain, Lifetime Achievement Award, 2nd Team All-American), Kevin served as the Assistant Coach of the University of Massachusetts Amherst Women's Ice Hockey Team and assisted with the implementation of the strength and conditioning program for the UMass Amherst Men's Ice Hockey Team. Recently, Kevin has joined the US Women's National Hockey Team as a Strength and Conditioning Coach, and has been an invited guest to NHL training camps to assist in the testing and training of the players. Kevin continues his work in ice hockey serving as a coach, educator, and program consultant in the sport.

An accomplished author, Kevin has had articles published in Men’s Fitness and many of the top fitness and performance sites, including AskMen.com, StrengthCoach.com, T-Nation.com, EliteFTS.com, and SportsRehabExpert.com. Kevin is the author of Ultimate Hockey Training, a comprehensive resource on long-term player development and year-round off-ice training methods.

Kevin received his Master’s degree in Kinesiology with a concentration in Exercise Neuroscience from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and his Bachelor’s degree from the University of Delaware with a major in Fitness Management and a minor in Strength and Conditioning.

The Grind

John Wooden

 

 

Call it deliberate practice, focused resolve, constant repetition, you may call it whatever you like, but I choose to call it the grind.  The grind is dressed in street clothes, wears a hard hat and packs a lunch box for a heavy days work! The grind is the long road, a path few choose to travel, marred with obstacles, mountains, valleys and shadows of the many spirits that have given up on their journey.  The grind is the best-kept secret to professional success.  It never ceases to amaze me that so many people try to bypass the grind to find instant gratification.  Coach John Wooden once said: “The quality of the effort is where I found-and continue to find-success.”  Success is not pure without sacrifice.  For this reason, I am forever grateful for “The Grind.”

-       Anthony Donskov, MS, CSCS, PES

 

Join BSMPG and hundreds of the world’s premiere Sports Performance and Sports Medicine professionals May 17 & 18, 2013 in Boston MA as they celebrate and embrace,

“The Grind.”

 

Register before the end of the year and enjoy a discounted price!

 

Register for the 2013 BSMPG </br>Summer Seminar Today

BSMPG and Ben Peterson - Repeated Sprint Work and Fatigue

BSMPG is proud to announce the addition of Ben Peterson as a speaker within the Sports Fusion Track at the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 17th and 18th, 2013!  Ben joins legendary track coach Randall Huntingon and Ben Prentiss along with keynote speakers, Dr. Stuart McGill, Marco Cardinale, Fergus Connolly, Adriaan Louw and Marvin Chun for this weekend event.  With the most thorough and integrated speaker line-up ever assembled, the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar will be the WORLD'S most sought after Sports Medicine & Performance Seminar to date!!

We are expecting the largest crowd in the history of BSMPG events with speakers and attendees traveling the globe to be in Boston in May of 2013, and thus have already made plans to move our main lecture hall to a newly renovated multi-tier auditorium.

Be sure to save the date now - hotels will fill fast with this event along with normal Boston traffic so start making plans now!

See you in Boston next May!!!

 

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Ben Peterson

BEN PETERSON, M.Ed., CSCS

Ph.D. Graduate Assistant, University of Minnesota

Topic: Repeated Sprint Ability: The metabolic and physiologic response to repeated sprint work and their implications for fatigue.

Ben is currently pursuing his Doctorate in Kinesiology and Exercise Physiology at the University of Minnesota. At the university he helps run the Sport Performance Lab, testing hundreds of athletes annually in sports ranging from cross-country skiing to football. In addition to his time in the lab, Ben helps teach two courses within the kinesiology department; Strength/Power Development and Health and Wellness. His research looks at repeated sprint ability in anaerobic athletes, specifically as it pertains to energy system efficiency and fatigue; looking at central and peripheral causes of decreased force production. His research also looks heavily at power and rate of force development in athletes and its dynamic correspondence and transferability to sport.

Ben is a graduate of Northwestern University where he played football for the Wildcats. He started his career as a performance coach working for the Minnesota Twins in 2008. Over the past five years, Ben’s passion and creativity have allowed him to work with over 100 professional athletes in the NHL, NFL, and MLB; helping them maximize the limits of their athletic potential. More recently, Ben co-Authored the book, Triphasic Training: A systematic approach to elite speed and explosive strength performance that explain the advanced training methods he uses to maximize force development and the scientific principles behind their implementation. When not teaching class or testing in the lab, Ben works as a consultant for Octagon Hockey, spending the NHL off-season working with their athletes in the Minneapolis area.

 

Visiting Boston - Your guide to Staying in Boston for BSMPG 2013

 

5 Steps to ensure your 2013 BSMPG Seminar is a Success 

 

2012 BSMPG Social

1. Remain Calm: Yes, it's true that we have the biggest names in Sports Medicine and Performance here in Boston for the 2013 Seminar and it's also true you might never be exposed to so much brain power under one roof ever again.  But this is no reason to start dancing around your apartment like a teenage school girl who just met Justin Bieber!  Ok, maybe it is.

2. Rest Up: we certainly know how to put on the best seminar in the industry - that's understood. If you've attended an event in the past you know we also know how to put on the best socials in the industry as well.  Bring Ibuprofen and a water bottle! 

Our motto: learn hard - play hard! 

3. Bring Business Cards: We know that you come for the best speakers in the world, but we've also been known to connect sports medicine and performance professionals with the best technology support companies, nutrition experts, and a number of other industry leaders from around the world with one another.  We don't want to brag - but we're also responsible for a number of interviews and jobs over the last few years.

4. Take Notes: Not during lectures silly! That's what the powerpoint and outlines we provide you are for. Some of the most powerful conversations take place during our scheduled breaktimes, lunch hours and social events.  With the leaders in sports medicine and performance from around the globe present as attendees, some of the biggest Ah-ha moments happen outside the lecture halls. Be ready with pen and paper in hand - you might not get another chance to talk to so many NHL and NBA coaches and therapists as you do at BSMPG!

5. Secure Lodging: During this week many Boston and area colleges and universities host graduations and because of this, area hotels book up fast.  We encourage those even thinking about attending to reserve hotel rooms now! You can always cancel the week leading up to the event, but if you wait until the week prior to book, you'll certainly be out of luck. Reserve your room now. See link below.

Click HERE for a complete list of our Hotel Partners.    

 

Recap: Get excited because we are planning the largest BSMPG Seminar to Date - book your travel, get a babysitter, reserve a hotel room, and bring your brain and party pants to Boston! 

Let's get it on BSMPG-ers! (yes, that's a Marvin Gaye reference)

See you soon!

 

Register today for the world's largest Sports Medicine and Performance Seminar - May 17 & 18, 2013. Boston MA 

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