Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group, LLC Blog

Boston, Basketball, and BSMPG

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Mar 2, 2015 @ 07:03 AM

 

basketball

 

Attention Basketball Performance Coaches

 

Join the leaders in Sports Medicine and Performance Training this May 15-16th in Boston for a multidisciplinary seminar that has more basketball content available than teams in March Madness! Your greatest challenge will be deciding which breakout session to attend throughout the two days!

 

Keynote Sessions

Dr. Robert Sapolsky: Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers – Stress, Disease and Coping

James Anderson: Realizing Tri-Planer Performance through the Respiratory Diaphragm

Al Smith: Helping People Be Their Best – A Journey From Specialism To Systems Thinking

Vincent Walsh: Sport – The Brain’s Greatest Challenge?

The Canadian National Basketball Performance Team:  Developing a Performance Team - A Look Behind the Curtain

 

Breakout Sessions

James Anderson: The lateralized Foot and Ankle Pattern and the Pronated Left Chest

Al Smith: Lost in Translation – The Appliance of Science in High Performance Sport

Sam Coad: Elite Athlete Monitoring Systems – Methods and Techniques for Assessing Recovery in Athletes

Charlie Weingroff: Utilizing a Movement Profile Into Your Neural Net

Eric Oetter: NeuroImmune Plasicity – The Substrate of Performance

Jay DeMayo: Athlete Preparation – An Open Discussion on U of Richmond’s Results Oriented Approach

Roman Fomin: Windows of Trainability

Sam Gibbs: TBA (Believe us it will be awesome)

Mike Davis: Bridging the Gap Between Rehab and High Performance

Mike Davis: Using Micro-movements to Manipulate Massive Movements

 

 

 

Register for the BSMPG  2015 Summer Seminar Today!

Topics: basketball conference

Why Butler Basketball Holds The Key To Organizational Success

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Feb 11, 2013 @ 07:02 AM

Basketball Seminar

 

by Jason Belzer, Contributer to Forbes.com

 

Over the better part of the last decade, no team has captivated the attention of sports fans across the country like the Butler University Bulldogs. A living embodiment of the mythical Hoosiers, the small school in Indianapolis has risen to the echelons of college basketballs elite over the last several years using modest resources and a budget substantially less than those teams it defeats on a regular basis. Time and again the Bulldogs manage to win games they shouldn’t with a roster of players who received little recruiting interest from blue-blooded programs like Duke and Kentucky. All the while, behind the curtain stands their mysterious young coach, Brad Stevens, concocting his next delightful magic trick.

While many have offered their own fleeting opinions as to why Butler has been so successful, the true answer has remained an enigma. To begin to unravel the mystery, one must dive deep into they culture of the school, athletics program, coaches and its players.

Almost 100 years ago, the legendary Paul “Tony” Hinkle began what would become a legendary half century reign over the Butler athletics program and community. A true renaissance man, Hinkle accumulated an incredible 1060-800-16 record over the course of his career coaching the Butler football, basketball and baseball teams. While the future “Wizard of Westwood”, John Wooden, was still perfecting his jump shot as a player up the road at Purdue, Hinkle was performing his own wizardry, leading the Bulldogs to two national titles and a reputation as “Big Ten Killers”. Even then, the small school from a small Midwest city was slaying giants.

The impact Hinkle had on the Butler program goes beyond just wins and losses. Under his leadership, Butler developed not only the first true culture of success in sports, but among modern day organizations as we know. Hinkle passed down his teachings to his coaching proteges and players throughout the years, the programs culture propagating into all aspects of the Butler community. Barry Collier, former head coach and now athletic director of the Bulldog program, eventually formalized the program philosophies by creating five pillars collectively called, “The Butler Way”:

  1. Humility – Those who humble themselves will be exalted;
  2. Passion – Do not be lukewarm, commit to excellence;
  3. Unity – Do not divide our house, team first;
  4. Servanthood – Make teammates better, lead by giving; and
  5. Thankfulness – Learn from every circumstance

Continue reading article by clicking HERE.

 

 

Join Level 5 Leaders from across the globe at the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar - Where the Leaders in Sports Medicine and Performance get their information.

 

Register for the 2013 BSMPG  Summer Seminar Today

 

 

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Topics: basketball conference, BSMPG Summer Seminar

World Pain Expert, Adriaan Louw Joins BSMPG 2013 Summer Seminar Keynote Speaker Set

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Aug 13, 2012 @ 06:08 AM

BSMPG is proud to announce Ariaan Louw as a keynote speaker at the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 17th and 18th, 2013!  Adriaan joins keynote speakers, Dr. Stuart McGill, Marco Cardinale, Fergus Connolly and Marvin Chun for this weekend event.  With the most thorough and integrated speaker line-up ever assembled, the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar will be the WORLD'S most sought after Sports Medicine & Performance Seminar to date!!

We are expecting the largest crowd in the history of BSMPG events with speakers and attendees traveling the globe to be in Boston in May of 2013, and thus have already made plans to move our main lecture hall to a newly renovated multi-tier auditorium.

Be sure to save the date now - hotels will fill fast with this event along with normal Boston traffic so start making plans now!

See you in Boston next May!!!

  

Adriaan Louw

 

BSMPG Summer Seminar

 

ADRIAAN LOUW, PT, PhD (c), M.App.Sc (physio), GCRM, CSMT

International Spine and Pain Institute

Adriaan Louw attended the University of Stellenbosch in Cape Town, South Africa, where he graduated in 1992 from an extensive physiotherapy program, including a very stringent manual therapy based training. Adriaan is an adjunct faculty member at Rockhurst University in Kansas City, where he teaches spinal manipulative therapy. Adriaan maintains clinical practice and is a co-owner, part-time clinician and spine specialist at The Ortho Spine and Pain Clinic in Story City, Iowa. Adriaan has been teaching postgraduate spinal manual therapy and pain science classes throughout the US and internationally since 1996. Adriaan completed his Graduate Certificate in Research Methodology from the University of South Australia, followed by his Masters degree in research into spinal surgery rehabilitation at his alma mater, Stellenbosch University. Adriaan is a Certified Spinal Manual Therapist through International Spine and Pain Institute. Adriaan is in the final stages of his PhD, focusing on therapeutic neuroscience education and spinal disorders. Adriaan has presented at numerous national and international manual therapy, pain science and medical conferences and has authored and co-authored numerous articles and book chapters related to spinal disorders and pain science.

 

Save the Date: May 17 & 18th, 2013 - Boston MA.  This will be one conference that you will not want to miss!!

Topics: Art Horne, Brian McCormick, basketball conference, Craig Liebenson, Chronic Pain, Adriaan Louw, BSMPG Summer Seminar, Cal Dietz, Marco Cardinale, Stuart McGill

Predicting Performance and Injury Resilience in Collegiate Basketball Athletes

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, Aug 1, 2012 @ 06:08 AM

 

by Art Horne

 

 

basketball performance resized 600

 

Just recently Dr. Stuart McGill, Jordan Andersen and myself published an article in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research examining the link between traditional pre-season strength, fitness, and sports medicine testing to overall on-court basketball performance and injury resilience throughout the course of two collegiate basketball seasons.  Although I would be the first to admit that there are some clear limitations to this study (number of participants for example), key performance predictors (points scored, ability to rebound, block shots, etc) were NOT associated with traditional strength or performance measures so often pursued in collegiate basketball strength programs.

Over the course of the next few weeks I will review this article in detail and provide insight into how actual on-court basketball performance may be improved upon beyond simply finding better parents or recruiting.  

 

Predicting Performance and Injury Resilience From Movement Quality and Fitness Scores in a Basketball Team Over 2 Years

McGill, Stuart M.1; Andersen, Jordan T.1; Horne, Arthur D.2

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

July 2012

 

Introduction

The ability to successfully predict injury resilience and competition performance from preseason testing is a very wishful goal; however, questions remain regarding this objective: Do tests of fitness have a predictive ability for injury and are there other factors that can be assessed that may predict injury? Are there specific indicators that predict performance? This study was motivated by these questions.

Attempts to understand injury mechanisms and performance sometimes consider links to fitness. Traditionally, fitness testing, at least in occupational settings, has included the assessment of strength (13), joint range of motion (ROM) (23), and physiological variables such as heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen uptake (2), but the performance scores in the occupational context are difficult to quantify. In contrast, there have been some studies relating fitness to sporting performance that are more tangible. In studies of ice hockey players (6,24), success could be more tangibly quantified from on-ice measures such as total minutes played and scoring chances. Green at al. stated that “goals scored” was not the best measure of hockey skill. Studies of football players suggest that those who score higher on movement quality tests have few injuries (11,12); however, preseason football combine testing is dominated by tests of strength and running speed. Recognizing that movement asymmetry and compromises to neuromuscular control have been linked to both future injury (11,12) and with having a history of back injury (17), movement assessments have been developed (3,4) and have been suggested to predict injury rates. Further, several fitness and movement tests have been implicitly assumed to predict “playing” performance by their inclusion into standard preseason tests. These include tests of endurance, strength, joint ROM, agility, and speed. The question remains as to the validity of these factors when attempting to predict injury resilience and performance.

Although links between moving well and injury resilience and performance seem intuitive, this notion remains controversial. Interestingly, some evidence suggests that fitness training alone may not ensure peak performance or injury resilience (8,20). In addition, movement quality has been suggested to predict future injury (12). A possible mechanism may be that injury changes the way a person moves as an accommodation to pain (consider, e.g., the changes in mechanics throughout the anatomical linkage when limping from foot pain). Having a history of injury, in particular back injury, appears to change movement patterns (17). Movement patterns determine important injury criteria, such as joint and tissue load, together with influencing the length of time and repetitions an individual is able to perform a task with uncompromised form. Compromised form exposes the tissues to inordinate load elevating the risk of injury. Several examples of this link are available, for example, not maintaining a neutral curve in the lumbar spine while bending and lifting decreases the tolerable load at injury (in this case tissue failure [18]); having restricted hip motion is linked to having more spine motion when bending (17). Movement competency has also been linked with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury rates, for example, having larger knee abduction moments and angles when landing from a jump predicted higher ACL injury rates (9). Given the variety of considerations for interpreting the links between movement, fitness, performance, and potential injury, the goal of this study was to first evaluate some traditional fitness test scores in a controlled athletic group that has a variety of challenging movement demands and also perform an assessment of the quality of movement. It was hoped that following a test group for a period of time would reveal links between specific fitness scores and movement quality with variables to predict injury resilience and performance. If such links exist, they could form a rationale for specific tests to be included in preseason testing.

The purpose of this study was to see if specific tests of fitness, and movement quality, could predict injury resilience and performance in a team of basketball players over 2 years (playing seasons).

It was hypothesized that in a university basketball population, (a) Preseason movement quality and fitness scores would predict in-season performance scores. (b). Preseason movement quality and fitness scores would predict in-season injury resilience.

 

 

See Dr. Stuart McGill and other world authority in Sports Medicine, Science and Performance at the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 17 & 18 in Boston MA

Topics: Art Horne, Brian McCormick, basketball performance, basketball conference, basketball training programs, athletic training conference, Craig Liebenson, Shawn Windle, Basketball Training, Stuart McGill, Keith D'Amelio

Interview with Coach Schexnayder : 2012 BSMPG Seminar Keynote Speaker

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Apr 30, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

LSU jump

 

 

This is part 1 of the weekly “Friday Five” series where I ask 5 tough questions to world class elite coaches.

Irving "Boo" Schexnayder is regarded internationally as one of the leading authorities in training design, especially in the Jump events.  He coached triple jumper Walter Davis, long jumper John Moffitt, and 19 NCAA Champions.

Boo will be speaking at the Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group (BSMPG) on May 19-20, 2012.

You can also see his complete jumps DVD package for the Long, Triple and High Jump (plus a weight training bonus).

Q1 – SpeedEndurance.com:  A lot of confusion and mystery lies with the true volumes of jump training that is sufficient for stimulating neuromuscular adaptions and teaching. While small doses are often looked at as the goal, teaching takes repetition. Could you expand on how important the sequence of the training year and the quality of foot strike?  Can you explain why it seems that some programs thrive off of higher volumes while some just lead to injury?

BOO:  As far as foot strike, the ability to properly dissipate impact forces through full-footed landings is obviously a huge help to staying injury free while jump training. I think there are two other, more subtle keys to successful progression and remaining injury free in jump training. The first lies in variety, specifically advancing training cycles in a timely fashion. The other is taking a purposeful approach to the process.

Just as athletes do, we as coaches tend to settle into comfort zones. You get your athletes doing particular forms of jump training. Then, as mastery is approached, it’s time to move on to something else, but our natural tendency is to breathe easy and admire our work for a while. Periodic shifts in exercise choice, volume and intensity are critical, even though they might make life for the coach tougher. Successful higher volume programs do this and show a bit of a pioneer spirit.

Also, everything done must have a very specific purpose. That purpose might be establishing initial volumes, technical development, high end or low end elastic strength development, or whatever. It’s easy to fall into a “this is my fallback workout” philosophy if you are not targeting something specific. This is the primary rationale behind the small volume programs, and I think this is the key with high training age athletes who have already accumulated injuries and other physical issues over the course of a career.

In either case, whether it is failure to progress or mindless repetition, at this point jump training quits being a stimulus and becomes simply another piece of baggage that must be carried around that increases injury risk.

Q2 – SpeedEndurance.com: You mention that Olympic lifts are great harmonizing agents to a program. With your experience could you address what mechanisms and systems such as posture and coordination enable the lifts to transfer to sprinting and jumping?

BOO:  The results I see in my program are the main reason I feel strongly about using Olympic lifts. I don’t want to give anyone the impression that I researched them first and then started to use them. My personal journey was more of a matter of seeing huge gains and then figuring out why.

I think the orders of joint firing and the mixing of absolute strength, power, and eccentric activity show huge transfer into sport specific skills. Also, the need to stabilize the core while performing something functional like an Olympic lift does more for the body’s core than all the crunches in the world. In short, they are highly functional.

I am a fan of functional training. But I have never gone completely that way, always keeping a base in more old school approaches. Maybe it’s because I started my career in football, but it’s also because I have watched too many great athletes train that way to scrap it.

I think a key variable in strength training is the amount of muscle tissue activated in the course of a repetition. That variable, more than any other, affects blood chemistry and endocrine responses. Many exercises are functional but don’t elicit enough muscle fiber activation to accomplish this. Olympics are where gross movements meet functional training and old school meets new school.

 

Continue reading on speedendurance.com   

 

See Coach Schexnayder at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar as he talks, "Mulitjump Exercises: Applications for Teaching, Training, and Rehab"

 

Coach Schexnayder joins Chris Powers, Craig Liebenson, Bill Knowles, and Alan Grodin as Keynotes speaers.  See these world class speakers along with the best Sports Medicine, Hockey and Basketball therapists and performance coaches throughout the weekend - May 19-20.


Register today before seats fill up!

 


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Topics: basketball conference, BSMPG, boston hockey summit, Craig Liebenson, boston hockey conference, athletic training books, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Barefoot in Boston

Monitoring Power Development : A Look at New Technology

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Apr 27, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

by Carl Valle

 

Kinetic

 

I decided to interview Rob Shugg from Kinetic Performance after hearing a few new definitions of what power is, and felt that we needed more sport science tools to help the performance community understand how to develop power in team sports. Track and field is very objective, but the methodologies tend to be cloudy. I wanted to get Rob's opinion on the matters of true development and monitoring of elite sport as he has many years with the Australian Institute of Sport and in the private sector with technology and performance. The BSMPG is the first conference in the US to promote Gymaware and Kinetic Performance as technology and data is becoming more and more important to help teams find the winning edge. 

Most of the US professional and college teams are familiar with linear transducers for measuring power, could you expand on the differences between Gymaware and the Tendo system, specifically with the advanced analytics and cloud benefits. 

First I’d like to give your readers a quick outline of the GymAware components:GymAware Power Tool - A linear transducer that connects via bluetooth to an iPad, iPod Touch or iPhone. 

iOS apps: 

GymAware Lite App - a stand-alone weightlifting analyzer app withextensive training, feedback and plotting functions. 

GymAware App - a cloud-connected weightlifting analyzer app offering online data and athlete management. 

GymAware/Kinetic-Athlete cloud analysis server - a web based account for managing and analysing Power Tool and other athlete performance data.So as you can see, while the Power Tool and the Tendo weightlifting analyser are both linear transducers, only GymAware offers a complete athlete performance stack, from data collection to athlete performance management. You canstill use the Power Tool like you use the Tendo unit to motivate and train athletes, but in addition you can start to look at[other variables] like dip and lift profile to improve technique. 

The GymAware Power Tool has evolved through 5 different models over the last 10 years with each new release improving accuracy and usability. There is a good comparison [here] between the latest Power Tool and the Tendo Power and Speed Analyzer. To talk about the benefits of the cloud server and advanced analytics, you first need to look at system accuracy as this is fundamental to the success of the advanced features.The high accuracy of the Power Tool opens up new opportunities in preparing athletes for competition. With high accuracy you can look for more subtle changes over time that give you real insight into the state of the athlete. 

Power is often pursued by teams, could you look at how power can act as a marker of both performance and fatigue with team sports? Currently Benchmarks and profiling seem to be important for individualization. 

There’s no doubt that power is a key factor in producing game winning performances, and power profiling to optimize power training plays a vital role in any professional team. But recently in Australia, regular (3 to 5 times per week) power and/or velocity monitoring has proved to be a very reliable way of monitoring for fatigue. At last year’s ASCA conference Dr Kristie Taylor suggested that we should 

Other performance managers have reported to us that the Power Tool measurements are so sensitive that they can see slower power recovery after games played at a particular stadium known to have a hard playing surface. Regular monitoring with GymAware adds a completely new dimension to the knowledge available to the sports performance professional. 

Kinetic Athlete is not new to player monitoring, why does Kinetic Performance's experience make you a leader in player management? I think to answer this you need to look at environment that lead to the development ofGymAware. 
 

Click HERE to continue reading...

 

Learn more about this new technology along with the most advanced health and performance monitoring tools currently available at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 19/20th.

 

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Topics: Art Horne, basketball conference, BSMPG, athletic training conference, Mike Curtis, hockey conference, Logan Schwartz, Andrea Hudy, Bruce Williams, Mike Boyle, Jim Snider, Mark Toomey, John DiMuro, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Joel Jamieson, Jeff Cubos, Keith D'Amelio

University of Kansas Strength Coach - Andrea Hudy Speaks at 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Sat, Apr 21, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

Andrea Hudy    BSMPG Summer Seminar

 

There are people that talk the talk, and then there are the people that actually walk the walk.  Andrea Hudy is the latter (and she probably does it Farmer Walk Style!)

Coach Hudy has put more kids in pro uniforms and judging on the way her Jayhawks played in the national championship game this past year, they'll be plenty more Kansas alums rocking the NBA hardcourt next season.  See Coach Hudy at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar as she headlines a list of the country's top basketball performance coaches including the NBA's Indiana Pacer's Shawn Windle, University of Texas Logan Schwartz and Keith D'Amelio (formally Stanford and Toronto Raptors Strength Coach - currently with Nike).

Read why KU found the right fit with strength coach Andrea Hudy below.

 

 

article by Tom Keegan

— Such silly, dangerous things can happen in the weight room, where steel clangs and challenges fly.

And then there is the facility supervised by Andrea Hudy, strength and conditioning coach for the Kansas University men’s and women’s basketball programs.

So much science goes into the planning of the workouts, the study of the progress each individual makes. Decisions are made with intellect, not emotion.

Well, most of the time anyway.

Former Kansas University reserve guard Jeremy Case, now an assistant coach at Southeastern Missouri State, is fuzzy about the details. He just remembers feeling “terrible” about what happened. Still does.

Hudy recalled more details, perhaps because pain has such a long memory.

Hudy said Case complained he couldn’t possibly do four repetitions of the weight she prescribed.

“It was a bet,” Hudy said. “I said ‘If you do that four times, I’ll do a multiple-fatigue set for 30 reps.’ He said, ‘You’re on.’ I took the bar off the rack, lowered it and I heard it (her shoulder popping.) Everybody heard it. I said, ‘I hurt my shoulder.’ He said, ‘You can’t stop now.’ I said, ‘All right, I’ll prove it to you.’ Twenty-nine reps later, I ended up in the training room.”

It’s a painful memory for more than just Hudy.

“Next day her arm’s in a sling,” Case said. “Damn, I feel so bad. Just goes to show how tough coach Hudy is. She’s no ordinary lady. Really tough lady.”

Hudy suffered a torn rotator cuff and torn labrum.

“I lost the battle, but I won the war,” Hudy said. “He didn’t think he could do four reps, and he did six.”

 

Click HERE to continue reading this article....

 

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Topics: basketball conference, athletic training conference, Charlie Weingroff, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin

Craig Liebenson and Clare Frank Talk Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Apr 6, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

 

BSMPG has begun plans to host DNS Course "B" in Boston in the spring of 2013.  Due to the overwhelming response of our Course "A" offering, we have begun plans to host course "B" next spring.

 

Stay tuned to bsmpg.com for complete details.

 

Click video below to watch interview with Boston Course "A" instructor, Clare Frank who would also be teaching Course "B" upcoming.

 

 

Click below to watch an interview with Craig Liebenson as he talks about the DNS approach.

 

See Craig Liebenson at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 19th and 20th in Boston MA.

Hurry - this program has a limited number of seats!

 

  Click me

 

 

 

 

Topics: basketball conference, athletic training conference, Craig Liebenson, Charlie Weingroff, Andrea Hudy, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Barefoot in Boston, Clare Frank

Kansas' Secret Weapon - Andrea Hudy Comes to Boston

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, Apr 4, 2012 @ 06:04 AM

Andrea Hudy

University of Kansas Strength & Conditioning Coach

Andrea Hudy

 

When the 7-foot center Jeff Withey showed up on the Kansas campus in 2009, he was a gawky San Diego kid who weighed a shrimp taco or two above 200 pounds. So how did he develop into the bruiser who has helped put the Jayhawks into the NCAA tournament's Final Four?

Withey credits two people. The first is Kansas assistant coach Danny Manning, a Jayhawk legend who won the 1988 national title, was selected No. 1 in the NBA draft and recently was named Tulsa's new coach. The other is a blonde-haired former college volleyball player named Andrea Hudy.

Withey describes her as "one of our secret weapons."

Click HERE to continue reading.

 

See Andrea and other top basketball coaches from across the country speak at the BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 19/20 in Boston.

 

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Topics: basketball performance, basketball conference, athletic training conference, Craig Liebenson, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles

DNS Course in Boston a Huge Success!!

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Apr 2, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

This past weekend, BSMPG hosted Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization Course "A" in Boston. 

 

This sold out event featured Clare Frank (pictured below) and Marcela Safarova (from the Czech Republic) as course instructors and was a huge hit!  

 

Interested about attending a future DNS course?

 

Read more about the DNS approach below as well as future opportunities both within the BSMPG network and offerings through Craig Liebenson.

 

 

DNS course clare frank

 

 

Click HERE to read more about DNS and about Craig Liebenson's experiences with DNS.

 

If you missed out on this exciting course work, don't worry! BSMPG is already making plans for another course "A" offering next year as well as a course "B" for those looking to advance their skills in DNS.

 

Can't wait for next year to learn more about DNS? No problem - Craig Liebenson is offering course work for both Sports Medicine professionals as well as fitness and strength professionals in the near future.  Click HERE to learn more about these exciting opportunities.

 

See Craig Liebenson lecture in Boston this May 19-20 as he presents both a Keynote presentation at the annual 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar as well as a breakout session the day following.  For complete details on Craig's presentation as well as a complete list of presenters and event details click HERE.  

Seats are limited for this event and are certain to sell out again this year.

 

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Topics: Art Horne, basketball conference, BSMPG, Craig Liebenson, boston hockey conference, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Dr. DiMuro, Clare Frank, dynamic neuromuscular stabilization