Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group, LLC Blog

Visiting Boston - Your guide to Staying in Boston for BSMPG 2013

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Thu, Oct 4, 2012 @ 07:10 AM


5 Steps to ensure your 2013 BSMPG Seminar is a Success 


2012 BSMPG Social

1. Remain Calm: Yes, it's true that we have the biggest names in Sports Medicine and Performance here in Boston for the 2013 Seminar and it's also true you might never be exposed to so much brain power under one roof ever again.  But this is no reason to start dancing around your apartment like a teenage school girl who just met Justin Bieber!  Ok, maybe it is.

2. Rest Up: we certainly know how to put on the best seminar in the industry - that's understood. If you've attended an event in the past you know we also know how to put on the best socials in the industry as well.  Bring Ibuprofen and a water bottle! 

Our motto: learn hard - play hard! 

3. Bring Business Cards: We know that you come for the best speakers in the world, but we've also been known to connect sports medicine and performance professionals with the best technology support companies, nutrition experts, and a number of other industry leaders from around the world with one another.  We don't want to brag - but we're also responsible for a number of interviews and jobs over the last few years.

4. Take Notes: Not during lectures silly! That's what the powerpoint and outlines we provide you are for. Some of the most powerful conversations take place during our scheduled breaktimes, lunch hours and social events.  With the leaders in sports medicine and performance from around the globe present as attendees, some of the biggest Ah-ha moments happen outside the lecture halls. Be ready with pen and paper in hand - you might not get another chance to talk to so many NHL and NBA coaches and therapists as you do at BSMPG!

5. Secure Lodging: During this week many Boston and area colleges and universities host graduations and because of this, area hotels book up fast.  We encourage those even thinking about attending to reserve hotel rooms now! You can always cancel the week leading up to the event, but if you wait until the week prior to book, you'll certainly be out of luck. Reserve your room now. See link below.

Click HERE for a complete list of our Hotel Partners.    


Recap: Get excited because we are planning the largest BSMPG Seminar to Date - book your travel, get a babysitter, reserve a hotel room, and bring your brain and party pants to Boston! 

Let's get it on BSMPG-ers! (yes, that's a Marvin Gaye reference)

See you soon!


Register today for the world's largest Sports Medicine and Performance Seminar - May 17 & 18, 2013. Boston MA 

Register for the 2013 BSMPG  Summer Seminar Today




Topics: Art Horne, Craig Liebenson, Brijesh Patel, Mike Curtis, Charlie Weingroff, BSMPG Summer Seminar, Cal Dietz, Jeff Cubos, Dan Boothby, Marco Cardinale, Marvin Chun, Fergus Connolly, Stuart McGill, Rob Butler, Clare Frank

Review of BSMPG 2012 Summer Seminar by Jason Lightfoot

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Jun 4, 2012 @ 07:06 AM


I recently attended the BSMPG Summer 2012 conference, and over the course of two days I realised how little I know. I got the opportunity to hear a number of really smart people speak (including Bill Knowles, Craig Liebenson, Dr John DiMuro, Mark Toomey, Art Horne, Dr Pete Viteritti, Keith D’Amelio, Chris Powers, Irving Schrexnayder and Alan Grodin).

It was awesome.

Firstly, a huge thanks to Art Horne and the rest of the people who made the conference possible. Fingers crossed I’ll be able to make the trip across the pond for it next year.

Here’s a snapshot of my notes which I scribbled down throughout the conference.


“Injury is an opportunity to become a better athlete”.

We shouldn’t be talking about return to play, we should be talking about a return to competition.

Are any of your athletes load compromised, or joint compromised?

The return to competitive strategy should be months or years long, not weeks.

“It’s easy to get an athlete back to sport, it’s hard to keep them back”


Continue to read this review by clicking HERE.

Topics: Art Horne, Craig Liebenson, Charlie Weingroff, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Dan Boothby, Chris Powers

BSMPG Summer Seminar Photo Gallary - 2012

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Jun 1, 2012 @ 07:06 AM

Another year, another success. 

View pictures from the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar below.  For the complete photo gallary click HERE.

SAVE THE DATE: BSMPG has announced May 17-18, 2013 as the date for our next summer seminar.  Speakers will be announced soon!

Thank you again to all our attendees, speakers, sponsors, and organizers!


Chris Powers




Lunch Time!



To view the complete picture set from the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar click HERE.



Topics: Art Horne, Craig Liebenson, Brijesh Patel, Charlie Weingroff, Cal Dietz, Dr. DiMuro, Dan Boothby, Chris Powers

Review of 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar by Jeff Cubos

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, May 23, 2012 @ 06:05 AM

BSMPG Summer Seminar


Year after year, Art Horne and the gang at the Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group host their anual Summer Seminar. Having heard nothing but positive feedback from colleagues who have attended in the past, I decided that this would be the year to finally attend. Living in Western Canada, it certainly isn’t easy to travel across the continent both from a time and financial perspective, but I felt that in order to continually better myself as a professional, attendance was a must. Like many of my previous educational endeavors, it was important for me to be 100% confident that this event was grounded in “educational conducivity” and not just a place where many of my friends were going to be. However, upon looking at the speaker lineup, it was more difficult to convince myself not to attend.

Perhaps the most challenging task however, was deciding which sessions to attend. So aside from the keynote lectures where all delegates were present, I found myself attending lectures from the following: Sean Skahan, Dr. John DiMuro & Mark Toomey, Art Horne & Dr. Pete Viteritti, Joel Jamieson, and Keith D’Amelio. So…

Continue to read this review by Jeff Cubos by clicking HERE



Topics: Craig Liebenson, Charlie Weingroff, Andrea Hudy, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Barefoot in Boston, Dr. DiMuro, Dan Boothby

Video from MIT Sloan Sport Analytics and Inside Tracker

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Thu, May 17, 2012 @ 07:05 AM


Meet Gil Blander and learn more about Inside Tracker from Segterra at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar.

InsideTracker analyzes your bloodwork and gives you recommendations and an optimal eating plan. All InsideTracker recommendations are based on scientific evidence and tailored to you. If your life changes, so does InsideTracker.




See the leaders in Sports Medicine and Performance at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar!

Seats are limited - Sign up before the last few seats are gone!


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Topics: Art Horne, BSMPG, Charlie Weingroff, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Jeff Cubos, Dan Boothby

Join OptoSource at BSMPG Summer Seminar

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, May 14, 2012 @ 08:05 AM




The Fusion Event Track at BSMPG

May 19th 2:30-3:30pm

The fusion of sports and medicine becomes a more potent mixture each day. Using tools that gauge performance with a high degree of accuracy allows us to quantify our results in almost any fashion imaginable. Tracking minute changes in the body such as heart rate, function, mobility and mechanics provides us information on our athletes that we can rely on to develop customized programs for each athlete. Real-time reporting functions provided by today’s latest technology make it simple and efficient to make evidenced based decisions in any setting.


Doctors, physicians and trainers are all working closely with one another to bring the most comprehensive care an athlete can hope for. Student athletes are among the top demographic to benefit from this union of sports and medicine where coaches and trainers regularly evaluate hundreds of students regularly. Coordinated care breeches team practices in addition to advising on lifestyle choices and curriculum.


Outside of institutions, merging is evident in private facilities where athletic development is the number one priority. Through the eyes of Dr. Thomas Lam, Director of Athletic Development at FITS Toronto, an environment focused on sports-science and coordinated care is a premier destination for training and therapy. Located in the hub of Canada, Dr. Lam’s two Toronto locations service every level of athlete, each equipped with a sports science lab. Tracking manipulations to the nervous system by evaluating the results in through changes to the biomechanical system, Evan Chait of Kinetic PT brings his discussion to OptoSource’s Fusion Track workshop.

For attendees of the Boston Sports Medicine & Performance Group, the Fusion Track will be the ideal chance to learn about incorporating data collection into sports performance planning and get a look at the best tools for managing all of the streams of information sports performance programs rely on today.

Speakers for this presentation include:

Dr. Thomas Lam of FITS Toronto on integrating objective analysis into an existing sports performance and medicine program.

Evan Chait of Kinetic PT will discuss The Chait Neuropathic Release Technique (CNRT), a multidisciplinary diagnostic and treatment process that focuses on 3 tiers of health. The 3 Tiers include the nervous system, biomechanical system, and the movement pattern system.


What to expect:

  • Using the cloud to safely and efficiently manage data.
  • Incorporating multiple streams of objective analysis into existing programs.
  • Tracking and trending change for coordinating care.


Visit OptoSource for more information!

See this track along with 22 other lectures to choose from during our 2 day event this May 19th and 20th.  A few seats remain - sign up before the last one goes!!!



 Click me


Topics: Art Horne, BSMPG, Craig Liebenson, Charlie Weingroff, Andrea Hudy, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Dan Boothby, Chris Powers

Leopards or Turtles? by Jose Fernandez

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, May 11, 2012 @ 07:05 AM




Basketball is a multifactorial sport where recovery, nutrition, training, technical & tactical aspects, mental preparation and innate conditions are involved. As S&C coaches, our ultimate goal is to enhance the team performance by optimising each player´s physical condition and helping them stay away from injuries.

Profiling athletes is an important part of the training process that helps me to decide what is the most appropriate strategy for each of the players I coach.

The image below represents the average results of 3 pre-season assessments to determine the % of Type I muscle fiber (Slow Twitch). It is an example of two different football players, both of them playing for the same team but with a different muscular profile.

The player on the left seems to have lower predominance of slow twitch as every muscle group except Semitendinosus (very postural muscle) is within 30-45% of slow muscle fibres.

The player on the right seems to have higher predominance of slow twitch, especially on key muscle groups like Biceps Fem (59,8%) and Gluteus Max (62%).

Click HERE to continue reading...

See Jose and other internationally known speakers at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar May 19-20th.

Hurry - Seats are limited.


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Topics: Art Horne, basketball performance, BSMPG, Craig Liebenson, boston hockey conference, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Barefoot in Boston, Dan Boothby

BSMPG & Bruce Williams : Hit The Ground Running - Video and Interview

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Thu, May 10, 2012 @ 07:05 AM

Take a sneak peek into Bruce Williams' presentation, New Concepts in Foot Function & Gait Analysis Assessments & Treatments, at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar.

Space is still available - Register today before the last seats are gone!


Click me




Most athletes and coaches think podiatrist means someone who makes orthotics, could you dispel that myth and talk about the holistic approach with foot care and how you even work with injuries in the low back? Many don't understand your profession deals with biomechanics, surgery, and even manual therapy.

Podiatry is a very interesting profession.  Surgery is really the highlight of what Podiatrists do and are trained to do at the present time.  All Podiatrists receive about a year of biomechanics while in school.  They are all trained to cast for orthotics and write prescriptions as well.  Some podiatrists utilize manual therapy in their practice, but probably less than 5%. 

In my practice I figured out very quickly my orthotic outcomes were not what I wanted them to be.  I set out to understand how I could do a better job for my patients and that lead me down a very interesting path of self- education.  I found a mentor to assist me in the use of in-shoe pressure and video capture technology.  He also happened to expose me to the use of manual therapy in the foot and ankle.  The use of the technology and the therapy really opened my eyes to what I was missing in practice.  The use of the quantitative data from the in-shoe pressure really exposed me to the way the foot will function and react to a shoe and to an OTC or custom foot orthosis.  This has helped me to realize my limitations in practice while also allowing me to move past most of my peers in the understanding of the foot’s importance in walking, and athletic gait. 

Most of my sports medicine podiatry peers are great collaborators with physical therapists, strength and conditioning coaches, athletic trainers and massage therapists.  We all realize that we are just a piece of the puzzle in the process of enabling our athletes to compete at their highest levels.


Barefoot training and minimalist shoes seem all the rage right now, can you share some objective pros and cons to what athletes may benefit and risk wise when diving into this territory?

Barefoot is the thing right now, just as toning / rocker bottom shoes were a few years back.  In moderation and in certain specific situations I see benefit for patients and athletes from both types of shoes.  The biggest problem I have with the minimalist / barefoot shoe debate is that there is very little proof that doing workouts barefoot will have the amazing results that so many people say they have had. 

I use a lot of technology to quantitate my outcomes, good or bad.  I would appreciate it if others would utilize similar technology to do the same.  Enthusiasm is wonderful, but there is a need to realize when something is not working the way we hoped it would and realize a different take is needed to get a successful outcome.  I have seen a lot of people chasing rainbows the last few years and it confuses me.  I appreciate the capacity of strength and conditioning to improve outcomes for athletes, but, there are limitations to what can be achieved and maintained.  I see the limitations daily with what I do and I try to refer to P.T. and strength coaches to assist my patients and athletes to achieve an overall better outcome.

I am regularly amazed that so many in the sports industry seem very anti-foot. I’m not really sure why this is, but my suspicion is that every podiatrist and many P.T.’s will put patients and athletes in an orthotic and often they do not work.  Podiatrists are very bad about this and often don’t have a specific reasoning or a plan for why they chose to use their devices.  I have a very specific reasoning pattern and evaluation process for doing what I do for my patients.  I really try to have a method to my madness.  I have a very good success rate, but not perfect by any means.  I am always looking for a new way to improve my outcomes whether it is through a new modification to a device, a new mobilization technique or through partnering with a better team of sports minded individuals so that we can all work together to benefit our athletes.


When the foot hits the ground a complex reaction of joints, muscles, and neurological responses happen. Could you share your approach with both technology and experience when working with athletes?

I use F-Scan in-shoe pressure and Dartfish as well as another older video capture technology.  I am starting to experiment with wireless emg and a nodular motion capture technology.  In-shoe pressure can give you a tremendous amount of insight into how an athlete’s foot and lower extremity functions.  There are however limitations to what the data can indicate.  This is why I use video capture and why I’m experimenting with the nodular motion capture.  It is important to know what the position of the hips, knees and lower extremity in general are doing for each step.  Relating this to the trunk position can give you insight as well. Once you have enough gait data from the trunk on down, then you can really start to incorporate a plan for the athlete from the ground up.  As you track going forward you should see what is working and what is not.

Wearable technology is being used now and will be utilized even more in the near future.  It is important to start to work with this technology or to partner with those who do use it regularly.  There are great benefits to quantifying evaluations and using wearable tech to validate plans of interventions is going to become the gold standard as we move forward.


You are familiar with different screens such as the FMS and traditional orthopedic assessments. Could you share your perspective on how some additional information from your methodology can help athletes reduce injuries?

FMS is a great screening tool and can give you quite a bit of information to help practitioners to formulate a plan for an athlete’s rehab or for their regular conditioning.

I have a basic screening tool that can assist or expand on the FMS as far as for evaluating the foot, ankle and lower extremity.  If you can gain a better understanding of how the foot is structured and functions then you can start to get a much better understanding of how your interventional plans will work and whether you can expect realistic improvement.

I like to use a basic scale to discern the structure and stiffness of the foot along the medial and lateral columns.  It is good to know the standing heel position of the foot, if there is any limb length difference left to right, and also the available range of motion of the big toe joints and the ankle joint.  Just having these few basic points of information can start to give insight to why an athlete may be prone to stress fractures of the metatarsals, chronic ankle sprains, and even if they may be prone to knee injuries.   Adding ranges of motion of the hips, and knees in static and walking gait can multiply your available knowledge base even more.

There are reasons and patterns for why some athletes get injured and why some do not.  Quantifying as much of the structural components of the foot and lower extremity function is the best way to start to identify those patterns.

** interview courtesy of Carl Valle



Topics: Craig Liebenson, Charlie Weingroff, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Barefoot in Boston, Dan Boothby, Chris Powers

Training Programs Made Easy - Cal Dietz and XL Athlete

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, May 9, 2012 @ 06:05 AM


Strength coaches seldom agree with one another.

But for all the things and subject matter they disagree about, there is one thing that every coach certainly would agree on.

It's not sets or reps.

It's not the use of Olympic lifts, or periodization method, or even conditioning protocols.


The one thing that all coaches agree on is the struggle to program and plan for large number numbers of athletes in a consistent and easy manner.

It's the one thing that ALL strength coaches would agree upon.

And now, thanks to Cal Dietz and XL Athlete, coaches can spend more time on the floor coaching and less time plugging numbers into excel files or adjusting programs because of an athlete's injury or because a sport coach changed training times.


Click HERE to learn more about the XL Strength Program Developer.


See Cal Dietz along with more of the nation's top hockey strength coaches and keynote speakers including Craig Liebenson and Chris Powers at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar this May 19th and 20th.


Click me


See Highlights from Coach Dietz's talk at the 2011 BSMPG summer seminar below.



Topics: Art Horne, Andrea Hudy, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Dan Boothby, Chris Powers

See Tomorrow's Training Technology Today

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Sat, May 5, 2012 @ 07:05 AM

Ever wonder why some Performance Coaches, Athletic Trainers, or Physical Therapists always seem to be ahead of the curve?

What do they see that you don't?

Sometimes having a little help from the sports science world and measuring progress can go a long way....

Be the first to see tomorrow's technology today at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 19th and 20th in Boston MA.

Click on each logo to learn more about each company and how they are changing the way we track and progress our athletes and patients.  

Stop chasing the pack, and start moving towards the front with the help from the leaders in advanced training technology from around the world!


TMG     visiblegains


ithlete          Polar



MyotestPRO          kinetic

Affectiva          BioSensics

Dartfish         zflo


Zeo            Free Lap



Tekscan      Optosource




Inside Tracker



Register for this event and for opportunities to win prizes from these sponsors today.


Seats are limited!


Click me


Topics: BSMPG, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, Craig Liebenson, Charlie Weingroff, barefoot strength training, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Barefoot in Boston, Dan Boothby, Clare Frank