Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group, LLC Blog

One of the best in College Basketball - BSMPG Summer Seminar

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Over the next month we will be previewing the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar speakers, their thoughts on the current state of Sports Medicine & Performance Training, how technology is influencing our profession (for better or worse) and preview their lectures.




Bobby Alejo   



North Carolina State Wolfpack

Assistant Athletics Director for Strength and Conditioning Bob Alejo oversees all of the strength and conditioning efforts of the department, and coordinates the day-to-day efforts of the men's basketball team.

Prior to joining the Wolfpack staff in April, Alejo served as the Director of Strength and Conditioning for the Oakland A's, a position he also held from 1993-2001. In that role, he was responsible for all aspects of the organization's year-round physical preparation at both the major league and minor league levels. 


1. How has the field of sports medicine/performance changed in the last five years? Where do you see the field headed in the next five years

1. A little more science in the field that is being used. Science has been and always will be the basis for S&C however not everyone subscribed to or  understood it. The FMS test is another big influence, at least in my instance, that has happened recently. My hope is that there is a better realization that the basics work every time all the time. There is a lot of new methods most of which aren't the most effective choices; the methods are new but the science is not.


2. Athlete monitoring and sports analytics has emerged as leading topics within Sports Medicine and Performance Training, how has this field influenced your practice?

Well, some of these analytics have been around for longer than people think. I remember in the 80's a soccer athlete of mine was coming back from Europe where they were testing for lactate. But, if looking at your data (testing scores and literature) and designing programs from the information makes you a slave then I have been guilty for 30 years. That's what your supposed to do!!!! Intuition of what might happen in the future is one thing but ignoring the numbers is a mistake.


3. What can attendees expect to hear from you at the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar? How may your lecture impact their practice on Monday morning?

Expect to hear what 30 years of experience has revealed. Not what I thought might have happened or what should have happened but rather "this is what I did and this is what happened". Don't tell me for example, that the Olympic lifts are dangerous after I tell you that I have not had one injury related to the Olympic lifts in 30 years. Or that overhead pressing is bad for the shoulder without giving one shred of evidence confirming the notion. In other words, what I do might not fit in your program or your philosophy but don't come to the conclusion that what someone has done cannot be done.