Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group, LLC Blog

BSMPG & Bruce Williams : Hit The Ground Running - Video and Interview

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Thu, May 10, 2012 @ 07:05 AM

Take a sneak peek into Bruce Williams' presentation, New Concepts in Foot Function & Gait Analysis Assessments & Treatments, at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar.

Space is still available - Register today before the last seats are gone!

 

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Most athletes and coaches think podiatrist means someone who makes orthotics, could you dispel that myth and talk about the holistic approach with foot care and how you even work with injuries in the low back? Many don't understand your profession deals with biomechanics, surgery, and even manual therapy.

Podiatry is a very interesting profession.  Surgery is really the highlight of what Podiatrists do and are trained to do at the present time.  All Podiatrists receive about a year of biomechanics while in school.  They are all trained to cast for orthotics and write prescriptions as well.  Some podiatrists utilize manual therapy in their practice, but probably less than 5%. 

In my practice I figured out very quickly my orthotic outcomes were not what I wanted them to be.  I set out to understand how I could do a better job for my patients and that lead me down a very interesting path of self- education.  I found a mentor to assist me in the use of in-shoe pressure and video capture technology.  He also happened to expose me to the use of manual therapy in the foot and ankle.  The use of the technology and the therapy really opened my eyes to what I was missing in practice.  The use of the quantitative data from the in-shoe pressure really exposed me to the way the foot will function and react to a shoe and to an OTC or custom foot orthosis.  This has helped me to realize my limitations in practice while also allowing me to move past most of my peers in the understanding of the foot’s importance in walking, and athletic gait. 

Most of my sports medicine podiatry peers are great collaborators with physical therapists, strength and conditioning coaches, athletic trainers and massage therapists.  We all realize that we are just a piece of the puzzle in the process of enabling our athletes to compete at their highest levels.

 

Barefoot training and minimalist shoes seem all the rage right now, can you share some objective pros and cons to what athletes may benefit and risk wise when diving into this territory?

Barefoot is the thing right now, just as toning / rocker bottom shoes were a few years back.  In moderation and in certain specific situations I see benefit for patients and athletes from both types of shoes.  The biggest problem I have with the minimalist / barefoot shoe debate is that there is very little proof that doing workouts barefoot will have the amazing results that so many people say they have had. 

I use a lot of technology to quantitate my outcomes, good or bad.  I would appreciate it if others would utilize similar technology to do the same.  Enthusiasm is wonderful, but there is a need to realize when something is not working the way we hoped it would and realize a different take is needed to get a successful outcome.  I have seen a lot of people chasing rainbows the last few years and it confuses me.  I appreciate the capacity of strength and conditioning to improve outcomes for athletes, but, there are limitations to what can be achieved and maintained.  I see the limitations daily with what I do and I try to refer to P.T. and strength coaches to assist my patients and athletes to achieve an overall better outcome.

I am regularly amazed that so many in the sports industry seem very anti-foot. I’m not really sure why this is, but my suspicion is that every podiatrist and many P.T.’s will put patients and athletes in an orthotic and often they do not work.  Podiatrists are very bad about this and often don’t have a specific reasoning or a plan for why they chose to use their devices.  I have a very specific reasoning pattern and evaluation process for doing what I do for my patients.  I really try to have a method to my madness.  I have a very good success rate, but not perfect by any means.  I am always looking for a new way to improve my outcomes whether it is through a new modification to a device, a new mobilization technique or through partnering with a better team of sports minded individuals so that we can all work together to benefit our athletes.

 

When the foot hits the ground a complex reaction of joints, muscles, and neurological responses happen. Could you share your approach with both technology and experience when working with athletes?

I use F-Scan in-shoe pressure and Dartfish as well as another older video capture technology.  I am starting to experiment with wireless emg and a nodular motion capture technology.  In-shoe pressure can give you a tremendous amount of insight into how an athlete’s foot and lower extremity functions.  There are however limitations to what the data can indicate.  This is why I use video capture and why I’m experimenting with the nodular motion capture.  It is important to know what the position of the hips, knees and lower extremity in general are doing for each step.  Relating this to the trunk position can give you insight as well. Once you have enough gait data from the trunk on down, then you can really start to incorporate a plan for the athlete from the ground up.  As you track going forward you should see what is working and what is not.

Wearable technology is being used now and will be utilized even more in the near future.  It is important to start to work with this technology or to partner with those who do use it regularly.  There are great benefits to quantifying evaluations and using wearable tech to validate plans of interventions is going to become the gold standard as we move forward.

 

You are familiar with different screens such as the FMS and traditional orthopedic assessments. Could you share your perspective on how some additional information from your methodology can help athletes reduce injuries?

FMS is a great screening tool and can give you quite a bit of information to help practitioners to formulate a plan for an athlete’s rehab or for their regular conditioning.

I have a basic screening tool that can assist or expand on the FMS as far as for evaluating the foot, ankle and lower extremity.  If you can gain a better understanding of how the foot is structured and functions then you can start to get a much better understanding of how your interventional plans will work and whether you can expect realistic improvement.

I like to use a basic scale to discern the structure and stiffness of the foot along the medial and lateral columns.  It is good to know the standing heel position of the foot, if there is any limb length difference left to right, and also the available range of motion of the big toe joints and the ankle joint.  Just having these few basic points of information can start to give insight to why an athlete may be prone to stress fractures of the metatarsals, chronic ankle sprains, and even if they may be prone to knee injuries.   Adding ranges of motion of the hips, and knees in static and walking gait can multiply your available knowledge base even more.

There are reasons and patterns for why some athletes get injured and why some do not.  Quantifying as much of the structural components of the foot and lower extremity function is the best way to start to identify those patterns.

** interview courtesy of Carl Valle

 

 

Topics: Craig Liebenson, Charlie Weingroff, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Barefoot in Boston, Dan Boothby, Chris Powers

Training Programs Made Easy - Cal Dietz and XL Athlete

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, May 9, 2012 @ 06:05 AM

 

Strength coaches seldom agree with one another.

But for all the things and subject matter they disagree about, there is one thing that every coach certainly would agree on.

It's not sets or reps.

It's not the use of Olympic lifts, or periodization method, or even conditioning protocols.

No.

The one thing that all coaches agree on is the struggle to program and plan for large number numbers of athletes in a consistent and easy manner.

It's the one thing that ALL strength coaches would agree upon.

And now, thanks to Cal Dietz and XL Athlete, coaches can spend more time on the floor coaching and less time plugging numbers into excel files or adjusting programs because of an athlete's injury or because a sport coach changed training times.

 

Click HERE to learn more about the XL Strength Program Developer.

 

See Cal Dietz along with more of the nation's top hockey strength coaches and keynote speakers including Craig Liebenson and Chris Powers at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar this May 19th and 20th.

 

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See Highlights from Coach Dietz's talk at the 2011 BSMPG summer seminar below.

 

 

Topics: Art Horne, Andrea Hudy, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Dan Boothby, Chris Powers

See Tomorrow's Training Technology Today

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Sat, May 5, 2012 @ 07:05 AM

Ever wonder why some Performance Coaches, Athletic Trainers, or Physical Therapists always seem to be ahead of the curve?

What do they see that you don't?

Sometimes having a little help from the sports science world and measuring progress can go a long way....

Be the first to see tomorrow's technology today at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 19th and 20th in Boston MA.

Click on each logo to learn more about each company and how they are changing the way we track and progress our athletes and patients.  

Stop chasing the pack, and start moving towards the front with the help from the leaders in advanced training technology from around the world!

 

TMG     visiblegains

 

ithlete          Polar

 

 

MyotestPRO          kinetic

Affectiva          BioSensics

Dartfish         zflo

 

Zeo            Free Lap

 


 

Tekscan      Optosource

 

 

 

Inside Tracker

 

 

Register for this event and for opportunities to win prizes from these sponsors today.

 

Seats are limited!

 

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Topics: BSMPG, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, Craig Liebenson, Charlie Weingroff, barefoot strength training, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Barefoot in Boston, Dan Boothby, Clare Frank

Up the Chain It Goes... (Part II)

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, May 4, 2012 @ 07:05 AM

By Art Horne

 

turf toe derrick rose toe injury

 

 

In a follow up from a previous post (Up The Chain It Goes), additional evidence supporting the relationship within the kinetic chain has emerged from south of the equator.  In a study out of South Africa examining the link between available dorsiflexion and mechanical low back pain researchers found a statistically significant decrease in ankle dorsiflexion ROM and associated reporting of low back pain (Brantingham, 2006).   With the vast majority of adults suffering from low back pain at some time in their life, (some reports are up to 85%) and 80% of people reporting foot problems during their lifespan, it’s not a surprise to see that these two conditions may very well be related.

Let’s take a closer look:

Methods: “ The study was a blinded, 2-arm, non-randomized clinical study involving 100 subjects with chronic or recurrent mechanical low back pain (intervention group) and 104 subjects without chronic mechanical low back pain (control group) between the ages of 18 and 45.  A blind assessor performed weight-bearing goniometry of the ankle and big toe and the navicular drop test on all subjects in both groups.”

Results: “An independent t-test (inter-group) revealed a statistically significant decrease in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion in individuals with chronic mechanical low back pain.”

Conclusions: “This study’s data found that a statistically significant decrease in ankle dorsiflexion ROM, but not flatter feet, was associated with subject report of chronic mechanical low back pain disorders.”

Discussion: “The findings of this blinded study support previous reports suggesting that decreased ankle dorsiflexion may be a factor in chronic mechanical low-back pain.  There was no clear association found between decreased hallux ROM and mechanical low back pain in this study.  If these findings are confirmed through additional studies, exercise and manipulation therapy to increase ankle range of motion could become an important consideration in the treatment of some patients with mechanical low back pain disorders.”

Hmmm, if only we had some additional studies….

Perhaps this will help.

During a routine exit physical, 60 division one athletes were assessed for available weight bearing dorsiflexion bilaterally as described by Bennell et al in 1998 (inclinometer was replace by Clinometer app for ITouch) to examine limitations in this movement.   Ten athletes with limited weight bearing dorsiflexion (less than 4 inches from knee to wall) volunteered for follow up evaluation and manual treatment. Out of the initial 120 measured ankles, 47 ankles (21 right, 26 left) demonstrated limited weight bearing dorsiflexion range of motion.

Athletes were then asked to walk normally in their athletic shoes while wearing an in-shoe pressure sensor (Tekscan) and through an optical measurement system (Optojump).  Each athlete then underwent a general manual therapy intervention aimed to improve ankle dorsiflexion, followed again by the same gait analysis and pressure mapping data capture.

 

Gait Evaluation

 

 

Gait Cliff Notes: optimal gait should have two mountains with a trough between them. The first mountain represents heel strike to midstance, the trough representing the mid-stance phase, and the second mountain being propulsion from full foot contact to toe-off.

Easy right? Good. 

Note: The second mountain should almost always be higher than the first.

 

Case Study 1:

Tekscan report

 

Pre-treatment (RED):

Notice how the first mountain is slightly higher than the second – this is BAD!

Remember from our cliff notes: the second mountain should be higher.

Post-treatment (GREEN):

Notice change in toe off from pre- to post-treatment which specifically targeted patient's limited dorsiflexion?  The second mountain is now higher than the first. That’s a GOOD thing!

Awesome right?

Better yet – athlete was measured 3 days post treatment and improvement in Dorsiflexion range of motion stuck!  Try doing that with a slant board stretch.

 

See Art Horne and Dr. Pete Viteritti discuss these and other changes at the foot and ankle, and how to assess and address soft tissue and bony restrictions in their presentation at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar May 19-20th in Boston.

 

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References

Bennell KL, Talbot RC, Wajswelner H, Techovanich W, Kelly DH and Hall AJ. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of a weight-bearing lunge measure of ankle dorsiflexion. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy. 44;175-180.

Brantingham JW, Gilbert JL, Shaik J, Globe G. Sagittal plane blockage of the foot, ankle and hallux and foot alignment-prevalence and association with low back pain. J of Chiropractic Medicine. 2006; 4(5); 123-127.

 

 

 

Topics: Art Horne, basketball performance, basketball training programs, boston hockey conference, barefoot strength training, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Barefoot in Boston, Chris Powers, Dorsiflexion

Q: Who Do The Top Athletes From Around The World Trust After Surgery?

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, May 2, 2012 @ 08:05 AM

A: Bill Knowles

There is a reason why top athletes and clubs from around the world seek out Bill Knowles after surgery.  He is simply one of the best in the world at returning athletes to pre-surgery performance levels. 

Meet Bill Knowles at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar, May 19-20th as he lectures about Reconditioning and Return to Competition Strategies for the Joint Compromised Athlete.

 

Bill Knowles

 

 

Notable Athletes

Notable Clubs/Teams  
(lectures-clinics-athletes)

  • Tiger Woods – Golf
  • Alex Rodriguez – Baseball/NY Yankees
  • Peyton Manning – Football/Indianapolis Colts
  • Jonny Wilkinson – Rugby/England
  • Dara Torres – Swimming/5x Olympian (12 medals)
  • Frank Lampard – Soccer/Chelsea-England
  • Tracy McGrady – Basketball
  • Shawn Horcoff – Ice Hockey/Edmonton Oilers-captain
  • England FA, Manchester United, Chelsea, Manchester City, Tottenham, Aston Villa, Bolton Wanderers, Middleborough, West Brom
  • England Rugby(RFU), Scotland Rugby(SRU), London Wasps, Leicester Tigers, London Irish, Harlequins, 
    Sale Sharks, Edinburgh
  • US Ski Team, Canadian Ski Team, Edmonton Oilers, Indianapolis Colts, San Jose Sharks

 

Athletic Development Coach and Sports Rehabilitation Specialist
Certified Athletic Trainer, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


Experience:
• 21 years professional experience working with World-class, Olympic, Professional, Elite, & Nationally ranked athletes from around the world.
• Professional and World-Class sports include: Soccer (football), Rugby Union, Ice Hockey, Basketball, Football, Aussie Rules Football, Golf, Alpine and Freestyle Mogul Skiing, Snowboarding and Swimming
•Former Head Athletic Trainer and Director of Strength and Conditioning at Burke Mountain Academy (Vermont, USA) for 12 years. BMA is recognized historically as the best youth sports academy in the world for alpine ski racing. 
The list of Olympic, World Cup, and World Junior success is unparallel in the Unites States and worldwide.
• Author of numerous articles on injury prevention and performance training in ski publications, strength and conditioning magazines and health journals.
• Featured speaker dozens of times around the United States, Canada, England and Scotland on topics related to injury reduction programs, rehabilitation/reconditioning, and performance training for all types of athletes.

For the past 21 years Bill Knowles has been working with elite level athletes from around the world. As a sports rehabilitation specialist, Bill has helped Professional and Olympic level athletes recover from season ending and career threatening injuries. His energy and enthusiasm keeps every training session educational and fresh, while his unique experiences allows a creative approach to address any injury situation. Bill’s rehab philosophy allows each athlete the opportunity to express their inherent athletic ability quickly following injury or surgery. This mean the “down time” is minimal and the athlete stays very active and motivated.

After receiving his education at Cortland State College in New York, Bill began his career at the world renowned sports academy for Alpine and Nordic ski racing; Burke Mountain Academy. As the Head Athletic Trainer and Performance Director Bill took care of countless knee injuries and developed his skills that began to attract world-class ski racers from Europe and North America. Since then athletes from England, Scotland, Ireland, and Australia have visited Bill in Killington, Vermont. Bill has also traveled extensively working with and visiting many of the top sports clubs in the world.

This success has evolved to designing and implementing rehab and performance programs that have placed athletes back into the English Premiership and Championship Football Leagues, The Rugby World Cup and Premiership Squads, Baseball World Series, Winter Olympic podiums and X-Game podiums.

As a former collegiate soccer player, ski racer, and coach, Bill delivers his training programs they way an athlete understands and respects.

 

Register for the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar Today!

 

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Topics: Craig Liebenson, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles

Interview with Coach Schexnayder : 2012 BSMPG Seminar Keynote Speaker

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Apr 30, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

LSU jump

 

 

This is part 1 of the weekly “Friday Five” series where I ask 5 tough questions to world class elite coaches.

Irving "Boo" Schexnayder is regarded internationally as one of the leading authorities in training design, especially in the Jump events.  He coached triple jumper Walter Davis, long jumper John Moffitt, and 19 NCAA Champions.

Boo will be speaking at the Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group (BSMPG) on May 19-20, 2012.

You can also see his complete jumps DVD package for the Long, Triple and High Jump (plus a weight training bonus).

Q1 – SpeedEndurance.com:  A lot of confusion and mystery lies with the true volumes of jump training that is sufficient for stimulating neuromuscular adaptions and teaching. While small doses are often looked at as the goal, teaching takes repetition. Could you expand on how important the sequence of the training year and the quality of foot strike?  Can you explain why it seems that some programs thrive off of higher volumes while some just lead to injury?

BOO:  As far as foot strike, the ability to properly dissipate impact forces through full-footed landings is obviously a huge help to staying injury free while jump training. I think there are two other, more subtle keys to successful progression and remaining injury free in jump training. The first lies in variety, specifically advancing training cycles in a timely fashion. The other is taking a purposeful approach to the process.

Just as athletes do, we as coaches tend to settle into comfort zones. You get your athletes doing particular forms of jump training. Then, as mastery is approached, it’s time to move on to something else, but our natural tendency is to breathe easy and admire our work for a while. Periodic shifts in exercise choice, volume and intensity are critical, even though they might make life for the coach tougher. Successful higher volume programs do this and show a bit of a pioneer spirit.

Also, everything done must have a very specific purpose. That purpose might be establishing initial volumes, technical development, high end or low end elastic strength development, or whatever. It’s easy to fall into a “this is my fallback workout” philosophy if you are not targeting something specific. This is the primary rationale behind the small volume programs, and I think this is the key with high training age athletes who have already accumulated injuries and other physical issues over the course of a career.

In either case, whether it is failure to progress or mindless repetition, at this point jump training quits being a stimulus and becomes simply another piece of baggage that must be carried around that increases injury risk.

Q2 – SpeedEndurance.com: You mention that Olympic lifts are great harmonizing agents to a program. With your experience could you address what mechanisms and systems such as posture and coordination enable the lifts to transfer to sprinting and jumping?

BOO:  The results I see in my program are the main reason I feel strongly about using Olympic lifts. I don’t want to give anyone the impression that I researched them first and then started to use them. My personal journey was more of a matter of seeing huge gains and then figuring out why.

I think the orders of joint firing and the mixing of absolute strength, power, and eccentric activity show huge transfer into sport specific skills. Also, the need to stabilize the core while performing something functional like an Olympic lift does more for the body’s core than all the crunches in the world. In short, they are highly functional.

I am a fan of functional training. But I have never gone completely that way, always keeping a base in more old school approaches. Maybe it’s because I started my career in football, but it’s also because I have watched too many great athletes train that way to scrap it.

I think a key variable in strength training is the amount of muscle tissue activated in the course of a repetition. That variable, more than any other, affects blood chemistry and endocrine responses. Many exercises are functional but don’t elicit enough muscle fiber activation to accomplish this. Olympics are where gross movements meet functional training and old school meets new school.

 

Continue reading on speedendurance.com   

 

See Coach Schexnayder at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar as he talks, "Mulitjump Exercises: Applications for Teaching, Training, and Rehab"

 

Coach Schexnayder joins Chris Powers, Craig Liebenson, Bill Knowles, and Alan Grodin as Keynotes speaers.  See these world class speakers along with the best Sports Medicine, Hockey and Basketball therapists and performance coaches throughout the weekend - May 19-20.


Register today before seats fill up!

 


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Topics: basketball conference, BSMPG, boston hockey summit, Craig Liebenson, boston hockey conference, athletic training books, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Barefoot in Boston

Meet Chris Powers - 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar Keynote Speaker

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Sat, Apr 28, 2012 @ 08:04 AM

 

Over the last decade no one has changed the way we approach and treat knee pain more than Chris Powers.  

Learn how the Hip is a major factor when it comes to the aches and pains associated with your knee at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar!

 

Chris Powers 

Topic: Proximal Factors Contributing to Running Injuries

 

Christopher M. Powers is an Associate Professor in the Division of Biokinesiology & Physical Therapy, and Co-Director of the MBRL at USC. He also has joint appointments in the Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery within the Keck School of Medicine.  His primary teaching responsibilities include the areas of biomechanics and the mechanics of human gait. He received a Bachelors degree in Physical Education from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1984, his Masters degree in Physical Therapy from Columbia University in 1987, and a Ph.D. in Biokinesiology in 1996 from USC. Dr. Powers did his post-doctoral training at the Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, University of California, Irvine.

Dr. Powers studies the biomechanical aspects of human movement. More specifically, his research and publications are concerned with the kinematic, kinetic and muscular actions associated with human movement, the pathomechanics of orthopedic disabilities and issues related to rehabilitation of the musculoskeletal system. He has published over 90 peer-reviewed articles and has received several research awards from the American Physical Therapy Association, including the Rose Excellence in Research Award from the Orthopaedic Section, the Eugene Michels New Investigator Award, the Dorothy Briggs Scientific Inquiry Award and the Helen J Hislop Award for contributions to the professional literature.

Dr. Powers is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine and a member of the American Physical Therapy Association (Orthopaedic and Research sections), American Society for Biomechanics, American Society for Testing and Measures, and the North American Society for Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis. In addition, Dr. Powers is on several editorial boards including the Journal of Applied BiomechanicsJournal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, and the Journal of Athletic Training.  He is an active member of the American Physical Therapy Association, serving as President of the Section on Research.

 

Education

  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Orthopaedic Biomechanics (1996-1997), University of California, Irvine, CA
  • Ph.D. Biokinesiology (1996). University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
  • M.S. Physical Therapy (1987). Columbia University, New York, NY
  • B.A. Physical Education (1984). University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

Selected Publications

  • Stefanik JJ, Zhu Y, Zumwalt AC, Gross KD, Clancy M, Lynch JA, Frey LA, Lewis CE, Roemer FW,Powers CM, Guermazi A, Felson DT. The association between patella alta and the prevalence and worsening of structural features of patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis: The Multicenter Osteoarthritics Study. Arthritis Care & Res (In press).
  • Farrohki S, Colletti PM, Powers CM. Differences in patella cartilage thickness, T2 relaxation time and cartilage deformational behavior: A comparison of young females with and without patellofemoral pain. Am J Sports Med (In press).
  • Chen YJ, Scher I, Powers CM. Quantification of patellofemoral joint reaction forces during functional tasks: A subject specific, three dimensional model. J Appl Biomech (In press).
  • Kulig K, Harper-Hanigan K, Souza RB, Powers CM. Measurement of femoral torsion by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging: Concurrent validity. Phys Ther (In pre).
  • Souza RB, Draper CE, Fredericson M, Powers CM. Femur rotation and patellofemoral joint kinematics: A weight-bearing MRI analysis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 40:277-285, 2010.
  • Powers CM, Chen YJ, Scher I, Lee TQ. Multi-plane loading of the extensor mechanism alters the patellar ligament force/quadriceps force ratio. J Biomed Eng. 132:024503, 2010.
  • Fithian DC, Powers CM, Khan N. Rehabilitation of the knee following medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction. Clin Sports Med. 29:283-290, 2010.
  • Powers CM, Blanchette MG, Brault JR, Flynn J, Siegmund GP. Validation of walkway tribometers: Establishing a reference standard. Submitted to: J Forensic Sci. 55:366-370, 2010.
  • Powers CM. The influence of abnormal hip mechanics on knee injury: A biomechanical perspective. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 40:42-51, 2010.
  • Wagner T, Behnia N, Ancheta WL, Shen R, Farrokhi S, Powers CM. Strengthening and neuromuscular re-education of the gluteus maximus in a triathlete with exercise-association cramping of the hamstrings: A case report. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 40:112-119, 2010.
  • Tonley JC, Dye JA, Kochevar RJ, Yun SM, Farrokhi S, Powers CM. Treatment of an individual with piriformis syndrome focusing on hip muscle strengthening and movement re-education: A case report. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 40:103-111, 2010.
  • Pollard CD, Sigward SM, Powers CM. Limited hip and knee flexion during landing is associated with increased frontal plane knee motion and moments. Clin Biomech. 25:142-146, 2010.
  • Tsai LC, Sigward SM, Pollard CD, Fletcher MJ, Powers CM. The effects of fatigue and recovery on knee kinetics and kinematics during side-step cutting. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 41:1952-1957, 2009.
  • Kulig K, Beneck GJ, Selkowitz DM, Popovich JM Jr., Ge TT, Flanagan SP, Poppert EM, Yamada K,Powers CM, Azen S, Winstein CJ, Gordon J, Samudrala S, Chen TC, Shamie N, Khoo L, Spoonamore MJ, Wang JC and Physical Therapy Clinical Research Network (PTClinResNet), The effect of an intensive, progressive exercise program on functional performance in patients post single-level lumbar microdiscectomy. Physical Therapy. 89:1145-1157, 2009.
  • Tsai YJ, Powers CM. The influence of footwear sole hardness on utilized coefficient of friction during walking. Gait & Posture. 30:303-306, 2009.
  • Souza RB, Powers CM. Concurrent criterion-related validity and reliability of a clinical test to measure femoral anteversion. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 39:586-592, 2009.
  • Souza RB, Powers CM. Predictors of hip rotation during running: An evaluation of hip strength and femoral structure in women with and without patellofemoral pain. Am J Sports Med. 37:579-587, 2009.
  • Souza RB, Powers CM. Differences in hip kinematics, muscle strength and muscle activation between subjects with and without patellofemoral pain. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 39:12-19, 2009.
  • Sigward SM. Ota S, Powers CM. Predictors of frontal plane knee excursion during a drop landing in young female athletes. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 38:661-667, 2008.
  • Brennglass A, Souza RB, Meyer J, Powers CM. Identification of abnormal hip motion associated with acetabular labral pathology: A resident’s case report. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 38:558-565, 2008.
  • Farrokhi S, Pollard CD, Souza R, Chen YJ, Reischl S, Powers CM. Trunk position influences lower extremity demands during the forward lunge exercise. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 38:403-409, 2008.
  • Tsai YJ, Powers CM. The influence of footwear sole hardness on slip initiation in young adults. J Forensic Sci. 53:884-888, 2008.
  • Powers CM, Doubleday KL, Escudero C. The influence of patellofemoral bracing on pain, knee extensor torque and gait function in females with patellofemoral pain. Physiother Theory Pract. 24:1-9, 2008.
  • Powers CM, Beneck GJ, Kulig K, Landel RF, Fredericson M. The effects of a single session of posterior to anterior spinal mobilization and press-ups on pain response and lumbar spine extension in persons with nonspecific low back pain. Phys Ther. 88:485-492, 2008.
  • Burke WS, Vangsness CT, Powers CM. Quantification of glenohumeral rhythm in persons with and without impingement. Am J Orthop. 37:24-30, 2008.
  • Landel RF, Kulig KK, Powers CM. Intertester reliability and validity of motion assessments during lumbar spine accessory motion testing. Phys Ther. 88:43-49, 2008.
  • Burnfield JM, Powers CM. The role of center of mass kinematics in predicting utilized coefficient of friction during walking. J Forensic Sci 52:1328-1333, 2007
  • Ward SR, Terk MR, Powers CM. Patella alta: Association with patellofemoral alignment and changes in contact area during weight bearing. J Bone & Joint Surg Am. 89:1749-1755, 2007.
  • Sigward S, Powers CM. Loading characteristics of female athletes who demonstrate excessive valgus moments at the knee during side-step cutting. Clin Biomech. 22:827-833, 2007.
  • Feller JA, Amis AA, Andrish JT, Arendt EA, Erasmus PJ, Powers CM. Surgical biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint. Arthroscopy. 23:542-553, 2007.
  • Pollard CD, Sigward S, Powers CM. Gender differences in hip joint kinematics and kinetics during a side-step cutting maneuver. Clin J Sports Med. 17:38-42, 2007.
  • Powers CM, Stefanou MA, Tsai YJ, Brault JR, Siegmund GP. Assessment of walkway tribometer readings in evaluating slip resistance: A gait based approach. J Forensic Sci. 52:400-405, 2007.
  • Kulig K, Powers CM, Landel R, Chen K, Fredericson M, Guillet M, Butts K. Segmental lumbar mobility in individuals with central low back pain: In-vivo assessment during passive and active motion using dynamic MRI. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 8:1-10, 2007.
  • Griffin LY, Albohm MJ, Arendt EA, Bahr R, Beynnon BD, DeMaio M, Dick RW, Engebretsen L, Garrett WE, Hannafin JA, Hewitt TE, Huston LJ, Ireland ML, Johnson RJ, Lephart S, Mandelbaum BR, Mann B, Marks RH, Marshal SW, Myklebust G, Noyes FR, Powers CM, Shields C, Schultz SJ, Silvers H, Slauterbeck J, Taylor D, Teitz CC, Wojtys EM, Yu B. Understanding and preventing noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Am J Sports Med. 34:1512-1532, 2006.
  • Powers CM, Chen YJ, Scher I, Lee TQ. Influence of patellofemoral joint contact geometry on the modeling of three dimensional patellofemoral joint forces. J Biomech. 39:2783-2791, 2006.
  • Selkowitz DM, Kulig K, Poppert EM, Flanagan SP, Mathews Nd, Beneck GJ, Popovich JM, Lona JR, Yamada KA, Burke WS, Ervin C, Powers CM. The immediate and long-term effects of exercise and patient education on physical, functional, and quality of life outcome measures after single-level lumbar microdiscectomy: A randomized controlled trial protocol. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 7:1-15, 2006.
  • Ota S, Ward SR, Chen YJ, Tsai YJ, Powers CM. Concurrent Criterion-Related validity and reliability of a clinical device used to assess lateral patella displacement. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 36:645-652, 2006.
  • Powers CM, Chen YJ, Farrohki S, Lee TQ. The role of peripatellar retinaculum in the transmission of forces within the extensor mechanism. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 88:2042-2048, 2006.
  • Burnfield JM, Powers CM. Prediction of slips: An evaluation of utilized coefficient of friction and available slip resistance. Ergonomics. 49:982-995, 2006.
  • Pollard CD, Sigward SS, Pelley K, Ota S, Powers CM. The influence of an in-season injury prevention program on lower extremity kinematics during landing in young female soccer players. Clin J Sports Med. 16:223-227, 2006.
  • Sigward SM, Powers CM. The influence of experience on knee joint kinematics, kinetics and muscle activation patterns during side-step cutting in young females. Clin Biomech. 21:740-747, 2006.
  • Ganley KJ, Powers CM. Intersegmental dynamics during the swing phase of gait: A comparison of knee kinetics between 7 year old children and adults. Gait Posture. 23:499-504, 2006.
  • Sigward S, Powers CM. The influence of gender on knee joint kinematics, kinetics and muscle activation patterns during side-step cutting. Clin Biomech. 21:41-48, 2006.

 

Meet Chris Powers, along with Craig Liebenson, Bill Knowles, Coach Schexnayder, and Alan Grodin as they headline the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar this May 19-20th in Boston.

This is an event that you don't want to miss!

 

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Topics: Art Horne, BSMPG, boston hockey summit, Charlie Weingroff, boston hockey conference, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Chris Powers

Monitoring Power Development : A Look at New Technology

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Apr 27, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

by Carl Valle

 

Kinetic

 

I decided to interview Rob Shugg from Kinetic Performance after hearing a few new definitions of what power is, and felt that we needed more sport science tools to help the performance community understand how to develop power in team sports. Track and field is very objective, but the methodologies tend to be cloudy. I wanted to get Rob's opinion on the matters of true development and monitoring of elite sport as he has many years with the Australian Institute of Sport and in the private sector with technology and performance. The BSMPG is the first conference in the US to promote Gymaware and Kinetic Performance as technology and data is becoming more and more important to help teams find the winning edge. 

Most of the US professional and college teams are familiar with linear transducers for measuring power, could you expand on the differences between Gymaware and the Tendo system, specifically with the advanced analytics and cloud benefits. 

First I’d like to give your readers a quick outline of the GymAware components:GymAware Power Tool - A linear transducer that connects via bluetooth to an iPad, iPod Touch or iPhone. 

iOS apps: 

GymAware Lite App - a stand-alone weightlifting analyzer app withextensive training, feedback and plotting functions. 

GymAware App - a cloud-connected weightlifting analyzer app offering online data and athlete management. 

GymAware/Kinetic-Athlete cloud analysis server - a web based account for managing and analysing Power Tool and other athlete performance data.So as you can see, while the Power Tool and the Tendo weightlifting analyser are both linear transducers, only GymAware offers a complete athlete performance stack, from data collection to athlete performance management. You canstill use the Power Tool like you use the Tendo unit to motivate and train athletes, but in addition you can start to look at[other variables] like dip and lift profile to improve technique. 

The GymAware Power Tool has evolved through 5 different models over the last 10 years with each new release improving accuracy and usability. There is a good comparison [here] between the latest Power Tool and the Tendo Power and Speed Analyzer. To talk about the benefits of the cloud server and advanced analytics, you first need to look at system accuracy as this is fundamental to the success of the advanced features.The high accuracy of the Power Tool opens up new opportunities in preparing athletes for competition. With high accuracy you can look for more subtle changes over time that give you real insight into the state of the athlete. 

Power is often pursued by teams, could you look at how power can act as a marker of both performance and fatigue with team sports? Currently Benchmarks and profiling seem to be important for individualization. 

There’s no doubt that power is a key factor in producing game winning performances, and power profiling to optimize power training plays a vital role in any professional team. But recently in Australia, regular (3 to 5 times per week) power and/or velocity monitoring has proved to be a very reliable way of monitoring for fatigue. At last year’s ASCA conference Dr Kristie Taylor suggested that we should 

Other performance managers have reported to us that the Power Tool measurements are so sensitive that they can see slower power recovery after games played at a particular stadium known to have a hard playing surface. Regular monitoring with GymAware adds a completely new dimension to the knowledge available to the sports performance professional. 

Kinetic Athlete is not new to player monitoring, why does Kinetic Performance's experience make you a leader in player management? I think to answer this you need to look at environment that lead to the development ofGymAware. 
 

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Learn more about this new technology along with the most advanced health and performance monitoring tools currently available at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 19/20th.

 

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Topics: Art Horne, basketball conference, BSMPG, athletic training conference, Mike Curtis, hockey conference, Logan Schwartz, Andrea Hudy, Bruce Williams, Mike Boyle, Jim Snider, Mark Toomey, John DiMuro, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Joel Jamieson, Jeff Cubos, Keith D'Amelio

Foam Rolling and Contractile Muscle Properties by Jose Fernandez

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, Apr 25, 2012 @ 06:04 AM

article by Jose Fernandez

 

 

 

After reading last week´s posts from Coach Boyle and Carl Valle I decided to do a little research on Self Myofascial Release and foam rolling. What motivated me is that there is not a clear protocol stablished regarding when, how and for how long athletes should use foam rollers. Some coaches recommend to roll before working out and others after, some coaches prefer to just continuously roll over the muscle surface and others recommend to hold on the trigger point for a few seconds.

What is foam rolling? (by wikipedia):

“Foam rolling is a self-myofascial release (SMR) technique that is used by athletes and physical therapists to inhibit overactive muscles. This form of stretching utilizes the concept of autogenic inhibition to improve soft tissue extensibility, thus relaxing the muscle and allowing the activation of the antagonist muscle.

It is accomplished by rolling the foam roller under each muscle group until a tender area is found, and maintaining pressure on the tender area for 30–60 seconds.”

Looking at the scientific evidence, I could not find a lot of published material either. See below some of papers I found:

A comparison of the pressure exerted on soft tissue by 2 myofascial rollers

Foam Rollers Show No Increase in the Flexibility of the Hamstring Muscle Group

The Acute Effect Of Self-Myofascial Release On Lower Extremity Plyometric Performance

In this case study we used Tensiomyography (TMG) to assess the change in contractile muscle properties (contraction time and muscle tone) after applying 2 different protocols with foam rollers. Click here to see one of my previous post with a detailed explanation about TMG and the information that it provides.

Foam Rolling & TMG Case Study:

The purpose of this case study was to analyse the change in contractile muscle properties assessed with TMG before and after applying two different SMR protocols using a foam roller. Characteristics of the roller that we used can be found here.

A professional basketball player (Age:22, H: 6.2ft, W: 198.4lbs, no injuries) with more than 6 months experience using foam rollers volunteered for the test, which was performed after a day off and consisted of assessing the Left Vastus Lateralis (dominant leg) with TMG before and after applying two different rolling interventions.

Protocol 1: Holding on the trigger point

- TMG Initial assessment on resting conditions

- Roll until the area of maximum pain is found. Hold the roll on that point for 30 seconds. Immediately after the 30 seconds continue rolling 5-6 times over the whole muscle surface

- TMG Post treatment Assessment 

Protocol 2: Cotinuous Rolling

- TMG Initial assessment

- Continuously roll over the whole muscle surface for 60 seconds

- TMG Post treatment Assessment

Restults:

Protocol 1:

 

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Topics: athletic training conference, boston hockey conference, barefoot strength training, Andrea Hudy, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Jose Fernandez

University of Kansas Strength Coach - Andrea Hudy Speaks at 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Sat, Apr 21, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

Andrea Hudy    BSMPG Summer Seminar

 

There are people that talk the talk, and then there are the people that actually walk the walk.  Andrea Hudy is the latter (and she probably does it Farmer Walk Style!)

Coach Hudy has put more kids in pro uniforms and judging on the way her Jayhawks played in the national championship game this past year, they'll be plenty more Kansas alums rocking the NBA hardcourt next season.  See Coach Hudy at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar as she headlines a list of the country's top basketball performance coaches including the NBA's Indiana Pacer's Shawn Windle, University of Texas Logan Schwartz and Keith D'Amelio (formally Stanford and Toronto Raptors Strength Coach - currently with Nike).

Read why KU found the right fit with strength coach Andrea Hudy below.

 

 

article by Tom Keegan

— Such silly, dangerous things can happen in the weight room, where steel clangs and challenges fly.

And then there is the facility supervised by Andrea Hudy, strength and conditioning coach for the Kansas University men’s and women’s basketball programs.

So much science goes into the planning of the workouts, the study of the progress each individual makes. Decisions are made with intellect, not emotion.

Well, most of the time anyway.

Former Kansas University reserve guard Jeremy Case, now an assistant coach at Southeastern Missouri State, is fuzzy about the details. He just remembers feeling “terrible” about what happened. Still does.

Hudy recalled more details, perhaps because pain has such a long memory.

Hudy said Case complained he couldn’t possibly do four repetitions of the weight she prescribed.

“It was a bet,” Hudy said. “I said ‘If you do that four times, I’ll do a multiple-fatigue set for 30 reps.’ He said, ‘You’re on.’ I took the bar off the rack, lowered it and I heard it (her shoulder popping.) Everybody heard it. I said, ‘I hurt my shoulder.’ He said, ‘You can’t stop now.’ I said, ‘All right, I’ll prove it to you.’ Twenty-nine reps later, I ended up in the training room.”

It’s a painful memory for more than just Hudy.

“Next day her arm’s in a sling,” Case said. “Damn, I feel so bad. Just goes to show how tough coach Hudy is. She’s no ordinary lady. Really tough lady.”

Hudy suffered a torn rotator cuff and torn labrum.

“I lost the battle, but I won the war,” Hudy said. “He didn’t think he could do four reps, and he did six.”

 

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Topics: basketball conference, athletic training conference, Charlie Weingroff, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin