Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group, LLC Blog

2015 CATAPULT Performance Directors Meeting - WINNING

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Dec 15, 2014 @ 08:12 AM

BSMPG is proud to announce both MIKE BOYLE and ERIK HELLAND as speakers at the 2015 CATAPULT Performance Directors Meeting - Sunday May 17th, 2015 - Fenway Park.

Join the leaders in Sports Medicine and Performance Training for this one day event following the 2015 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 15-16th, 2015.  Inquire at - serious thought leaders only!


Mission of the CATAPULT Performance Directors Meeting: To provide the leaders in performance training and medical oversight an opportunity to engage with leaders of similar attitude, vision, and entrepreneurial spirit, while pursuing innovative strategies in performance methodology. 

This is a limited capacity event and will be held to 50 of the top thought and change leaders from across the globe.


boyle1 red sox


Topic: Worst to First - Developing a Culture of Winning

Michael Boyle is known internationally for his pioneering work in the field of Strength & Conditioning and is regarded as one of the top experts in the area for Sports Performance Training. He has made his mark on the industry over the past 30 years with an impressive following of professional athletes, from the US Women’s Olympic teams in Soccer and Ice Hockey to the Boston BruinsBoston Breakers, New England Revolution, and most recently the Boston Red Sox. His client list over the years reads like a Who’s Who of athletic success in New England and across the country including legendary Boston names such as Nomar Garciaparra, Cam Neely, and Ray Bourque. 

 In 2012, Michael was selected to become part of the Boston Red Sox coaching staff, acting as a strength and conditioning consultant for the team. 


Erik Helland bsmpg


Topic: Sustaining a Championship Mindset

Erik Helland enters his second year as Wisconsin's men's basketball strength and conditioning coach in 2014-15. In his first season, the Badgers posted the third, 30-win season in school history advancing to the 2014 Final Four.

Helland, who has served on the Chicago Bulls strength and conditioning staff since 1988 and the head strength coach since 2001, has over two decades of experience as a certified National Strength and Conditioning specialist and level I USA Weightlifting coach.

Helland's tenure with the Bulls included six NBA championships, including a pair of three-peats, and an NBA record 72 regular-season wins in 1995-96.

Following 13 seasons as an assistant, Helland took over the reins of the strength program in 2001, where his duties included conducting some of the most comprehensive testing protocols in the NBA, assisting in pre-NBA Draft workouts and NBA free agent assessments.

Helland has consulted with numerous college and professional strength and conditioning programs, and has worked extensively with athletes from the NFL and European Basketball Leagues, as well as professional, collegiate and high school athletes from nearly every sport.

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Topics: Mike Boyle, Erik Helland

Monitoring Power Development : A Look at New Technology

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Apr 27, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

by Carl Valle




I decided to interview Rob Shugg from Kinetic Performance after hearing a few new definitions of what power is, and felt that we needed more sport science tools to help the performance community understand how to develop power in team sports. Track and field is very objective, but the methodologies tend to be cloudy. I wanted to get Rob's opinion on the matters of true development and monitoring of elite sport as he has many years with the Australian Institute of Sport and in the private sector with technology and performance. The BSMPG is the first conference in the US to promote Gymaware and Kinetic Performance as technology and data is becoming more and more important to help teams find the winning edge. 

Most of the US professional and college teams are familiar with linear transducers for measuring power, could you expand on the differences between Gymaware and the Tendo system, specifically with the advanced analytics and cloud benefits. 

First I’d like to give your readers a quick outline of the GymAware components:GymAware Power Tool - A linear transducer that connects via bluetooth to an iPad, iPod Touch or iPhone. 

iOS apps: 

GymAware Lite App - a stand-alone weightlifting analyzer app withextensive training, feedback and plotting functions. 

GymAware App - a cloud-connected weightlifting analyzer app offering online data and athlete management. 

GymAware/Kinetic-Athlete cloud analysis server - a web based account for managing and analysing Power Tool and other athlete performance data.So as you can see, while the Power Tool and the Tendo weightlifting analyser are both linear transducers, only GymAware offers a complete athlete performance stack, from data collection to athlete performance management. You canstill use the Power Tool like you use the Tendo unit to motivate and train athletes, but in addition you can start to look at[other variables] like dip and lift profile to improve technique. 

The GymAware Power Tool has evolved through 5 different models over the last 10 years with each new release improving accuracy and usability. There is a good comparison [here] between the latest Power Tool and the Tendo Power and Speed Analyzer. To talk about the benefits of the cloud server and advanced analytics, you first need to look at system accuracy as this is fundamental to the success of the advanced features.The high accuracy of the Power Tool opens up new opportunities in preparing athletes for competition. With high accuracy you can look for more subtle changes over time that give you real insight into the state of the athlete. 

Power is often pursued by teams, could you look at how power can act as a marker of both performance and fatigue with team sports? Currently Benchmarks and profiling seem to be important for individualization. 

There’s no doubt that power is a key factor in producing game winning performances, and power profiling to optimize power training plays a vital role in any professional team. But recently in Australia, regular (3 to 5 times per week) power and/or velocity monitoring has proved to be a very reliable way of monitoring for fatigue. At last year’s ASCA conference Dr Kristie Taylor suggested that we should 

Other performance managers have reported to us that the Power Tool measurements are so sensitive that they can see slower power recovery after games played at a particular stadium known to have a hard playing surface. Regular monitoring with GymAware adds a completely new dimension to the knowledge available to the sports performance professional. 

Kinetic Athlete is not new to player monitoring, why does Kinetic Performance's experience make you a leader in player management? I think to answer this you need to look at environment that lead to the development ofGymAware. 

Click HERE to continue reading...


Learn more about this new technology along with the most advanced health and performance monitoring tools currently available at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 19/20th.


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Topics: Art Horne, basketball conference, BSMPG, athletic training conference, Mike Curtis, hockey conference, Logan Schwartz, Andrea Hudy, Bruce Williams, Mike Boyle, Jim Snider, Mark Toomey, John DiMuro, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Joel Jamieson, Jeff Cubos, Keith D'Amelio

Q: What Has 9 NCAA Ice Hockey Championship Rings and Will Be In Boston May 19th and 20th?

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Apr 23, 2012 @ 07:04 AM


Answer: Attendees at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar!

There's a reason the nation's top Performance Coaches, Athletic Trainers, and Therapists come back to Boston year after year! Join the following coaches and learn how you can help your team this off-season and prepare for a championship run in 2013!


Russ DeRosa - Boston College Men's Ice Hockey 2008, 2010, 2012 National Champions

Mike Boyle - Boston University Men's Ice Hockey 1995, 2009 National Champions

Jim Snider - University of Wisconsin Women's Ice Hockey 2009, 2011 National Champions

Cal Dietz - University of Minnesota Women's Ice Hockey 2010, 2012 National Champions



Looking for that edge in your team's training for this coming season?  Join Hockey's elite performance coaches and therapists at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar!


BSMPG Hockey Summit

Hurry!! Seats are limited - There's only room for so many championship trophy's in the same room!


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Topics: boston hockey conference, Mike Boyle, Jim Snider, Cal Dietz

A Bigger Box

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Apr 5, 2010 @ 09:04 AM

I hate when people say, “You need to think outside the box,” like they’ve just discovered the world was round.

Since when was reading articles or attending conferences “thinking outside the box”?  When did practicing evidence-based medicine or implementing strength programming other than 3 sets of 10 on bench press every Monday become novel thinking?

Some people just need to get a bigger box.

Art Horne is the Coordinator of Care and Strength & Conditioning Coach for the Men’s Basketball Team at Northeastern University, Boston MA.  He can be reached at


Register for the May 2010 Basketball and Hockey Conference!


Topics: Strength Training, basketball conference, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, boston hockey conference, Mike Boyle, barefoot running, mental toughness, northeastern

Who Wins - Mental Toughness or Daily Discipline?

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Thu, Mar 11, 2010 @ 20:03 PM

    When I hear strength coaches talk about discipline, I often think about an example that Jim Collins gives from his book, Good to Great, where he describes the “rinsing your cottage cheese factor.”

    He writes, “The analogy comes from a disciplined world-class athlete named Dave Scott, who won the Hawaii Ironman Triathlon six times. In training, Scott would ride his bike 75 miles, swim 20,000 meters, and run 17 miles - on average, every single day.  Dave Scott did not have a weight problem! Yet he believed that a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet would give him an extra edge. So, Dave Scott - a man who burned at least 5,000 calories a day in training - would literally rinse his cottage cheese to get the extra fat off. Now, there is no evidence that he absolutely needed to rinse his cottage cheese to win the Ironman; that’s not the point of the story.  The point is that rinsing his cottage cheese was simply one more small step that he believed would make him just that much better, one more small step added to all the other small steps to create a consistent program of superdiscipline."

    I’ve often thought that discipline is the one virtue which set the very best athletes apart from those that were merely average.  However, much has been made recently of developing mental toughness in our athletes in order to better prepare them for “when the going gets tough”.  My friend, Brijesh Patel, Head Strength and Conditioning at Quinnipiac, has done a terrific job writing and presenting on this exact topic and has convinced me and a number of other coaches to integrate some of his strategies into our own programming.  Whether it’s a grueling finishing exercise, an ungodly number of sprints, or work-capacity circuits that the Geneva Conventions would call abusive, the goal remains the same; push the athlete to a limit they are uncomfortable with so when the same uncomfortable situation arises in competition they are ‘mentally tough’ enough to persevere.

    I remember the exact moment I asked Mike Boyle about training athletes in order to develop mental toughness. His response: “Being tough is showing up on time, every time.  It’s about doing the little things all the time.  That’s tough.”  From that moment forward I became conflicted on whether these mental toughness programs/exercises were simply making my athletes tired (I mean, anyone can make a kid sweat, tired and cramp) or if I was in fact instilling an inner warrior mentality that would be unleashed at the time of competition?

    I think we all understand the mental toughness part, but instilling a culture of “superdiscipline” as described by Collins means demanding and having our athletes touch the baseline each and every time during conditioning drills, closing out under control on a three-point shooter with hands up instead of  “fly-by” which basically takes you out of the play pending a missed shot, “Walling Up” on your man with arms straight up and staying down instead of leaving your feet during a fake shot attempt, defending for the entire 35 second shot clock, showing up on time for a 2:00pm lift (that’s not walking in the door at 2:00 pm but rather being prepared and ready at 2:00pm), being the first on the floor at practice to get extra shots up AND having purpose to your shooting drills (putting up 300 shots vs. putting up 300 total shots with the goal of making 70 percent from the left elbow after a cross-over dribble), coming to the weight room 10 min early to address mobility and stretching needs outside the scope of training that day, waking up 15 minutes early so you can eat breakfast rather than show up for 6am lift on an empty stomach, or disciplined enough to pack snacks and plan your meals for the next day so you don’t begin afternoon practice on an empty stomach. Now THAT’S being “superdisiplined”.

    So when the game is on the line, when you must get a defensive stop to seal a win, or when you have to stretch a ball screen all the way, was your success or failure due to your athlete’s mental toughness or a lifestyle of “rinsing the cottage cheese”?

Art Horne is the Coordinator of Care and Strength & Conditioning Coach for the Men’s Basketball Team at Northeastern University, Boston MA.  He can be reached at

Register for this year's Boston Hockey Summit and Basketball Symposium!





Topics: basketball conference, boston hockey summit, training, Good to Great, discipline, Mike Boyle, sports performance, mental toughness, superdiscipline