Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group, LLC Blog

See Tomorrow's Training Technology Today

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Sat, May 5, 2012 @ 07:05 AM

Ever wonder why some Performance Coaches, Athletic Trainers, or Physical Therapists always seem to be ahead of the curve?

What do they see that you don't?

Sometimes having a little help from the sports science world and measuring progress can go a long way....

Be the first to see tomorrow's technology today at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 19th and 20th in Boston MA.

Click on each logo to learn more about each company and how they are changing the way we track and progress our athletes and patients.  

Stop chasing the pack, and start moving towards the front with the help from the leaders in advanced training technology from around the world!


TMG     visiblegains


ithlete          Polar



MyotestPRO          kinetic

Affectiva          BioSensics

Dartfish         zflo


Zeo            Free Lap



Tekscan      Optosource




Inside Tracker



Register for this event and for opportunities to win prizes from these sponsors today.


Seats are limited!


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Topics: BSMPG, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, Craig Liebenson, Charlie Weingroff, barefoot strength training, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Barefoot in Boston, Dan Boothby, Clare Frank

Interview with Coach Schexnayder : 2012 BSMPG Seminar Keynote Speaker

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Apr 30, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

LSU jump



This is part 1 of the weekly “Friday Five” series where I ask 5 tough questions to world class elite coaches.

Irving "Boo" Schexnayder is regarded internationally as one of the leading authorities in training design, especially in the Jump events.  He coached triple jumper Walter Davis, long jumper John Moffitt, and 19 NCAA Champions.

Boo will be speaking at the Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group (BSMPG) on May 19-20, 2012.

You can also see his complete jumps DVD package for the Long, Triple and High Jump (plus a weight training bonus).

Q1 –  A lot of confusion and mystery lies with the true volumes of jump training that is sufficient for stimulating neuromuscular adaptions and teaching. While small doses are often looked at as the goal, teaching takes repetition. Could you expand on how important the sequence of the training year and the quality of foot strike?  Can you explain why it seems that some programs thrive off of higher volumes while some just lead to injury?

BOO:  As far as foot strike, the ability to properly dissipate impact forces through full-footed landings is obviously a huge help to staying injury free while jump training. I think there are two other, more subtle keys to successful progression and remaining injury free in jump training. The first lies in variety, specifically advancing training cycles in a timely fashion. The other is taking a purposeful approach to the process.

Just as athletes do, we as coaches tend to settle into comfort zones. You get your athletes doing particular forms of jump training. Then, as mastery is approached, it’s time to move on to something else, but our natural tendency is to breathe easy and admire our work for a while. Periodic shifts in exercise choice, volume and intensity are critical, even though they might make life for the coach tougher. Successful higher volume programs do this and show a bit of a pioneer spirit.

Also, everything done must have a very specific purpose. That purpose might be establishing initial volumes, technical development, high end or low end elastic strength development, or whatever. It’s easy to fall into a “this is my fallback workout” philosophy if you are not targeting something specific. This is the primary rationale behind the small volume programs, and I think this is the key with high training age athletes who have already accumulated injuries and other physical issues over the course of a career.

In either case, whether it is failure to progress or mindless repetition, at this point jump training quits being a stimulus and becomes simply another piece of baggage that must be carried around that increases injury risk.

Q2 – You mention that Olympic lifts are great harmonizing agents to a program. With your experience could you address what mechanisms and systems such as posture and coordination enable the lifts to transfer to sprinting and jumping?

BOO:  The results I see in my program are the main reason I feel strongly about using Olympic lifts. I don’t want to give anyone the impression that I researched them first and then started to use them. My personal journey was more of a matter of seeing huge gains and then figuring out why.

I think the orders of joint firing and the mixing of absolute strength, power, and eccentric activity show huge transfer into sport specific skills. Also, the need to stabilize the core while performing something functional like an Olympic lift does more for the body’s core than all the crunches in the world. In short, they are highly functional.

I am a fan of functional training. But I have never gone completely that way, always keeping a base in more old school approaches. Maybe it’s because I started my career in football, but it’s also because I have watched too many great athletes train that way to scrap it.

I think a key variable in strength training is the amount of muscle tissue activated in the course of a repetition. That variable, more than any other, affects blood chemistry and endocrine responses. Many exercises are functional but don’t elicit enough muscle fiber activation to accomplish this. Olympics are where gross movements meet functional training and old school meets new school.


Continue reading on   


See Coach Schexnayder at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar as he talks, "Mulitjump Exercises: Applications for Teaching, Training, and Rehab"


Coach Schexnayder joins Chris Powers, Craig Liebenson, Bill Knowles, and Alan Grodin as Keynotes speaers.  See these world class speakers along with the best Sports Medicine, Hockey and Basketball therapists and performance coaches throughout the weekend - May 19-20.

Register today before seats fill up!


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Topics: basketball conference, BSMPG, boston hockey summit, Craig Liebenson, boston hockey conference, athletic training books, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Barefoot in Boston

Meet Chris Powers - 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar Keynote Speaker

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Sat, Apr 28, 2012 @ 08:04 AM


Over the last decade no one has changed the way we approach and treat knee pain more than Chris Powers.  

Learn how the Hip is a major factor when it comes to the aches and pains associated with your knee at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar!


Chris Powers 

Topic: Proximal Factors Contributing to Running Injuries


Christopher M. Powers is an Associate Professor in the Division of Biokinesiology & Physical Therapy, and Co-Director of the MBRL at USC. He also has joint appointments in the Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery within the Keck School of Medicine.  His primary teaching responsibilities include the areas of biomechanics and the mechanics of human gait. He received a Bachelors degree in Physical Education from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1984, his Masters degree in Physical Therapy from Columbia University in 1987, and a Ph.D. in Biokinesiology in 1996 from USC. Dr. Powers did his post-doctoral training at the Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, University of California, Irvine.

Dr. Powers studies the biomechanical aspects of human movement. More specifically, his research and publications are concerned with the kinematic, kinetic and muscular actions associated with human movement, the pathomechanics of orthopedic disabilities and issues related to rehabilitation of the musculoskeletal system. He has published over 90 peer-reviewed articles and has received several research awards from the American Physical Therapy Association, including the Rose Excellence in Research Award from the Orthopaedic Section, the Eugene Michels New Investigator Award, the Dorothy Briggs Scientific Inquiry Award and the Helen J Hislop Award for contributions to the professional literature.

Dr. Powers is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine and a member of the American Physical Therapy Association (Orthopaedic and Research sections), American Society for Biomechanics, American Society for Testing and Measures, and the North American Society for Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis. In addition, Dr. Powers is on several editorial boards including the Journal of Applied BiomechanicsJournal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, and the Journal of Athletic Training.  He is an active member of the American Physical Therapy Association, serving as President of the Section on Research.



  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Orthopaedic Biomechanics (1996-1997), University of California, Irvine, CA
  • Ph.D. Biokinesiology (1996). University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
  • M.S. Physical Therapy (1987). Columbia University, New York, NY
  • B.A. Physical Education (1984). University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

Selected Publications

  • Stefanik JJ, Zhu Y, Zumwalt AC, Gross KD, Clancy M, Lynch JA, Frey LA, Lewis CE, Roemer FW,Powers CM, Guermazi A, Felson DT. The association between patella alta and the prevalence and worsening of structural features of patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis: The Multicenter Osteoarthritics Study. Arthritis Care & Res (In press).
  • Farrohki S, Colletti PM, Powers CM. Differences in patella cartilage thickness, T2 relaxation time and cartilage deformational behavior: A comparison of young females with and without patellofemoral pain. Am J Sports Med (In press).
  • Chen YJ, Scher I, Powers CM. Quantification of patellofemoral joint reaction forces during functional tasks: A subject specific, three dimensional model. J Appl Biomech (In press).
  • Kulig K, Harper-Hanigan K, Souza RB, Powers CM. Measurement of femoral torsion by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging: Concurrent validity. Phys Ther (In pre).
  • Souza RB, Draper CE, Fredericson M, Powers CM. Femur rotation and patellofemoral joint kinematics: A weight-bearing MRI analysis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 40:277-285, 2010.
  • Powers CM, Chen YJ, Scher I, Lee TQ. Multi-plane loading of the extensor mechanism alters the patellar ligament force/quadriceps force ratio. J Biomed Eng. 132:024503, 2010.
  • Fithian DC, Powers CM, Khan N. Rehabilitation of the knee following medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction. Clin Sports Med. 29:283-290, 2010.
  • Powers CM, Blanchette MG, Brault JR, Flynn J, Siegmund GP. Validation of walkway tribometers: Establishing a reference standard. Submitted to: J Forensic Sci. 55:366-370, 2010.
  • Powers CM. The influence of abnormal hip mechanics on knee injury: A biomechanical perspective. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 40:42-51, 2010.
  • Wagner T, Behnia N, Ancheta WL, Shen R, Farrokhi S, Powers CM. Strengthening and neuromuscular re-education of the gluteus maximus in a triathlete with exercise-association cramping of the hamstrings: A case report. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 40:112-119, 2010.
  • Tonley JC, Dye JA, Kochevar RJ, Yun SM, Farrokhi S, Powers CM. Treatment of an individual with piriformis syndrome focusing on hip muscle strengthening and movement re-education: A case report. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 40:103-111, 2010.
  • Pollard CD, Sigward SM, Powers CM. Limited hip and knee flexion during landing is associated with increased frontal plane knee motion and moments. Clin Biomech. 25:142-146, 2010.
  • Tsai LC, Sigward SM, Pollard CD, Fletcher MJ, Powers CM. The effects of fatigue and recovery on knee kinetics and kinematics during side-step cutting. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 41:1952-1957, 2009.
  • Kulig K, Beneck GJ, Selkowitz DM, Popovich JM Jr., Ge TT, Flanagan SP, Poppert EM, Yamada K,Powers CM, Azen S, Winstein CJ, Gordon J, Samudrala S, Chen TC, Shamie N, Khoo L, Spoonamore MJ, Wang JC and Physical Therapy Clinical Research Network (PTClinResNet), The effect of an intensive, progressive exercise program on functional performance in patients post single-level lumbar microdiscectomy. Physical Therapy. 89:1145-1157, 2009.
  • Tsai YJ, Powers CM. The influence of footwear sole hardness on utilized coefficient of friction during walking. Gait & Posture. 30:303-306, 2009.
  • Souza RB, Powers CM. Concurrent criterion-related validity and reliability of a clinical test to measure femoral anteversion. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 39:586-592, 2009.
  • Souza RB, Powers CM. Predictors of hip rotation during running: An evaluation of hip strength and femoral structure in women with and without patellofemoral pain. Am J Sports Med. 37:579-587, 2009.
  • Souza RB, Powers CM. Differences in hip kinematics, muscle strength and muscle activation between subjects with and without patellofemoral pain. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 39:12-19, 2009.
  • Sigward SM. Ota S, Powers CM. Predictors of frontal plane knee excursion during a drop landing in young female athletes. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 38:661-667, 2008.
  • Brennglass A, Souza RB, Meyer J, Powers CM. Identification of abnormal hip motion associated with acetabular labral pathology: A resident’s case report. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 38:558-565, 2008.
  • Farrokhi S, Pollard CD, Souza R, Chen YJ, Reischl S, Powers CM. Trunk position influences lower extremity demands during the forward lunge exercise. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 38:403-409, 2008.
  • Tsai YJ, Powers CM. The influence of footwear sole hardness on slip initiation in young adults. J Forensic Sci. 53:884-888, 2008.
  • Powers CM, Doubleday KL, Escudero C. The influence of patellofemoral bracing on pain, knee extensor torque and gait function in females with patellofemoral pain. Physiother Theory Pract. 24:1-9, 2008.
  • Powers CM, Beneck GJ, Kulig K, Landel RF, Fredericson M. The effects of a single session of posterior to anterior spinal mobilization and press-ups on pain response and lumbar spine extension in persons with nonspecific low back pain. Phys Ther. 88:485-492, 2008.
  • Burke WS, Vangsness CT, Powers CM. Quantification of glenohumeral rhythm in persons with and without impingement. Am J Orthop. 37:24-30, 2008.
  • Landel RF, Kulig KK, Powers CM. Intertester reliability and validity of motion assessments during lumbar spine accessory motion testing. Phys Ther. 88:43-49, 2008.
  • Burnfield JM, Powers CM. The role of center of mass kinematics in predicting utilized coefficient of friction during walking. J Forensic Sci 52:1328-1333, 2007
  • Ward SR, Terk MR, Powers CM. Patella alta: Association with patellofemoral alignment and changes in contact area during weight bearing. J Bone & Joint Surg Am. 89:1749-1755, 2007.
  • Sigward S, Powers CM. Loading characteristics of female athletes who demonstrate excessive valgus moments at the knee during side-step cutting. Clin Biomech. 22:827-833, 2007.
  • Feller JA, Amis AA, Andrish JT, Arendt EA, Erasmus PJ, Powers CM. Surgical biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint. Arthroscopy. 23:542-553, 2007.
  • Pollard CD, Sigward S, Powers CM. Gender differences in hip joint kinematics and kinetics during a side-step cutting maneuver. Clin J Sports Med. 17:38-42, 2007.
  • Powers CM, Stefanou MA, Tsai YJ, Brault JR, Siegmund GP. Assessment of walkway tribometer readings in evaluating slip resistance: A gait based approach. J Forensic Sci. 52:400-405, 2007.
  • Kulig K, Powers CM, Landel R, Chen K, Fredericson M, Guillet M, Butts K. Segmental lumbar mobility in individuals with central low back pain: In-vivo assessment during passive and active motion using dynamic MRI. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 8:1-10, 2007.
  • Griffin LY, Albohm MJ, Arendt EA, Bahr R, Beynnon BD, DeMaio M, Dick RW, Engebretsen L, Garrett WE, Hannafin JA, Hewitt TE, Huston LJ, Ireland ML, Johnson RJ, Lephart S, Mandelbaum BR, Mann B, Marks RH, Marshal SW, Myklebust G, Noyes FR, Powers CM, Shields C, Schultz SJ, Silvers H, Slauterbeck J, Taylor D, Teitz CC, Wojtys EM, Yu B. Understanding and preventing noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Am J Sports Med. 34:1512-1532, 2006.
  • Powers CM, Chen YJ, Scher I, Lee TQ. Influence of patellofemoral joint contact geometry on the modeling of three dimensional patellofemoral joint forces. J Biomech. 39:2783-2791, 2006.
  • Selkowitz DM, Kulig K, Poppert EM, Flanagan SP, Mathews Nd, Beneck GJ, Popovich JM, Lona JR, Yamada KA, Burke WS, Ervin C, Powers CM. The immediate and long-term effects of exercise and patient education on physical, functional, and quality of life outcome measures after single-level lumbar microdiscectomy: A randomized controlled trial protocol. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 7:1-15, 2006.
  • Ota S, Ward SR, Chen YJ, Tsai YJ, Powers CM. Concurrent Criterion-Related validity and reliability of a clinical device used to assess lateral patella displacement. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 36:645-652, 2006.
  • Powers CM, Chen YJ, Farrohki S, Lee TQ. The role of peripatellar retinaculum in the transmission of forces within the extensor mechanism. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 88:2042-2048, 2006.
  • Burnfield JM, Powers CM. Prediction of slips: An evaluation of utilized coefficient of friction and available slip resistance. Ergonomics. 49:982-995, 2006.
  • Pollard CD, Sigward SS, Pelley K, Ota S, Powers CM. The influence of an in-season injury prevention program on lower extremity kinematics during landing in young female soccer players. Clin J Sports Med. 16:223-227, 2006.
  • Sigward SM, Powers CM. The influence of experience on knee joint kinematics, kinetics and muscle activation patterns during side-step cutting in young females. Clin Biomech. 21:740-747, 2006.
  • Ganley KJ, Powers CM. Intersegmental dynamics during the swing phase of gait: A comparison of knee kinetics between 7 year old children and adults. Gait Posture. 23:499-504, 2006.
  • Sigward S, Powers CM. The influence of gender on knee joint kinematics, kinetics and muscle activation patterns during side-step cutting. Clin Biomech. 21:41-48, 2006.


Meet Chris Powers, along with Craig Liebenson, Bill Knowles, Coach Schexnayder, and Alan Grodin as they headline the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar this May 19-20th in Boston.

This is an event that you don't want to miss!


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Topics: Art Horne, BSMPG, boston hockey summit, Charlie Weingroff, boston hockey conference, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Chris Powers

Interval Training vs. Aerobic Base? - The Answer May Surprise You

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Apr 13, 2012 @ 07:04 AM


Joel Jamieson

Recently, there has been a sudden shift from the once poplular and often prescribed high intensity interval training to at least a greater appreciation and understanding of the aerobic system and its contribution to elite physical conditioning and game preparation.  At the heart of this subject matter is none other than Joel Jamieson - BSMPG 2012 Summer Seminar Speaker.

Learn more from Joel along with a number of the country's top performance coaches at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar.  But don't wait - seats are limited and this event is sure to sell out again this year!

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Excerpt from:



Method #5 Threshold Training


At the beginning of this chapter, I told you that it was important to increase how much power you could generate aerobically so that you had to rely less on fatiguing anaerobic processes to generate the necessary ATP. The threshold training method is very effective at helping you increase your aerobic power and achieve this goal. The basic premise of the method is very simple, by working your aerobic system to the maximum limits of its energy production abilities, the body adapts by increasing the total number of aerobic enzymes and improving overall contractile properties. As a result, the maximum rate of aerobic energy production increases.

If you’ll recall from earlier, the point where your body begins to shift the majority of its ATP generation from aerobic to anaerobic is known as the anaerobic threshold. This is a very important point because it reflects the maximum sustainable output that your aerobic system is capable of. If we can raise your anaerobic threshold and/or increase your power output at the threshold, then you’ll have to rely less on the anaerobic systems and you’ll have better endurance.

Although there is definitely some genetic influence that determines where your anaerobic threshold is, it’s also a very trainable quality because we can dramatically increase how much power you’re able to produce aerobically through the proper training methods. Threshold training is one of the methods and consists of training at heart rates at or near your anaerobic threshold for different periods of time. Because you are essentially asking your body to produce ATP as fast as it possibly can while predominantly using the aerobic system, this method places a great deal of stress on the entire system and provides a strong stimulus for it to improve. This is one of the reasons it is so effective, but it also means you have to be fairly precise in determining your threshold.

For maximum effectiveness, you want to train in a heart range that is within +/- 5 bpm of your anaerobic threshold. Unfortunately, there is no simple and easy way for most people to determine where their anaerobic thresholds are exactly. The most accurate way is through a gas exchange test done at an exercise performance lab, but this is obviously impractical for most people. If you have access to a metabolic testing center in your area, this can offer an effective way to determine your threshold and it typically runs between $75 and $125 for the test.

Aside from using a laboratory testing procedure, it can be difficult to get an accurate gauge of where exactly your anaerobic threshold is. The next best alternative is to use a simple test I came up with and perform 3x5 minute sparring rounds at a relatively high pace with a heart rate monitor on. If you don’t spar, then you can do 3x5 minute pad rounds or something comparable such as the modified coopers test as described in  a later chapter.

For the test, you will need to use a heart rate monitor with a lap function and I specifically recommend the Polar RS100 for this purpose. If you don’t have one of these yet you can order one directly from my website at All you have to do is record your average heart rate for each of the three rounds, excluding the 60s break between rounds, and take your average heart rate over the entire 3 rounds. While there is no research on this approach to show it accurately reflects your anaerobic threshold, I’ve found it to be reasonably close for most people and it is much better than just guessing.

Once you have found your average heart rate over the three rounds, this is the heart rate number you should use for the threshold training method. To use the threshold method, all you have to do is keep your heart rate at +/- 5 bpm for repetitions of 3-10 minutes at a time using different types of exercises. Many athletes use this method in the form of circuit style training, although they rarely pay attention to where their heart rate is during the circuit. You can use running, MMA drills and sparring, cycling, etc. But keep in mind you’ll need to lower your heart rate range by 5-10 bpm in activities where you are sitting or lying down.


Topics: athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, boston hockey conference, Joel Jamieson

Interview with Mark Toomey and Dr. John DiMuro - 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar Presenters

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, Mar 28, 2012 @ 07:03 AM

Co-Presenters at the 2011 BSMPG Summer Seminar, Dr. John DiMuro and Mark Toomey return to Boston in May for the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar for a series of lectures that are sure to provide attendees with a number of monumental "ah-ha" moments as they show with fluoroscopy EXACTLY what is happening during exercises in both your rehabilitation and performance training programs.  

The difference between what you thought was happening during simple exercises and what is actually occuring at each joint will have you thinking twice before you prescribe your next exercise program or therapeutic intervention.


Click HERE to listen to a recent interview with Dr. DiMuro and Mark Toomey on



Mark Toomey


Dr John DiMuro DO, MBA

Dr. DiMuro is a Board Certified Anesthesiologist and Pain Medicine expert who specializes in advanced interventional pain treatments for all types of pain conditions. He grew up in central New Jersey prior to attending medical and business school in Philadelphia . He has an M.B.A. in health care management from St. Joseph 's University and completed his internship at the Tampa Bay Heart Institute. He was chief resident during his Anesthesiology residency at Georgetown University in Washington , D.C. prior to completing a pain medicine fellowship at the world-renowned Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City . He currently serves on the Carson Tahoe Hospital Cancer Committee. He continues to work in private practice and lectures nationally for the Kimberly Clark Company and Boston Scientific.

Mark Toomey, Sr RKC, CSCS

Mark Toomey is a fitness instructor from Reno , Nevada . He serves as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) in fitness and conditioning for the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. He is the Director of Operations for Dragon Door Publications, a producer of cutting edge material on strength and conditioning and acts as a Senior Instructor for the RKC, the first and largest entity specializing in kettlebell and body weight exercise instruction. Mark is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and a certified CK-FMS practitioner.


Be sure to register for the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar today before they sell out!

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Topics: basketball conference, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, Craig Liebenson, boston hockey conference, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Dan Boothby, barefoot running

Readings from last week

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Mar 26, 2012 @ 07:03 AM

Readings from last week.



Cold-Water Immersion for Preventing and Treating Muscle Soreness After Exercise  


Predictive Factors for Ankle Sprain  


Assessing the SI Joint   


Don't forget to sign up for the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar featuring Dr. Craig Liebenson along with 14 other leaders from the worlds of sports medicine, performance and hockey/basketball specific training!


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Topics: Art Horne, basketball resources, BSMPG, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, basketball videos, hockey conference, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Dan Boothby

Triphasic Training: A Systematic Approach to Elite Speed and Explosive Strength

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Mar 23, 2012 @ 07:03 AM


Cal Dietz



by Art Horne 

I recently travelled to Minnesota to visit a few friends and spend time with the strength coaches from both the Minnesota Timberwolves and the University of Minnesota.  If you’ve ever been to Minnesota you know that packing a winter jacket is a must and this trip this was clearly not the exception!


My first stop was with Cal Dietz from the University of Minnesota.  I’ve mentioned Cal’s new book, Triphasic Training a number of times before, but sitting down with Cal in front of a whiteboard and reviewing his training philosophy gave me a new appreciation and a monumental “ah ha” moment for the three phases of muscle action.



Excerpt from Cal’s book: Preface p. VII





That one simple sentence is what ties every sport together and allows all athletes to be trained using the same method, yielding the same results.  It is what this entire book is about.  Understanding the physiologic nature of muscle action taking place during dynamic movements gives you, the coach, a foundational training method that can be applied to every sport.  Couple this method with a periodization schedule that can be altered to fit with any training time frame and you have the tri-phasic undulating block method.


In a very brief and basic explanation that will be expanded upon at length in later chapters, the triphasic nature of all dynamic movement can be broken down into three phases:

1)   Eccentric phase: This is the deceleration or lowering portion of the movement.  It is associated with muscle lengthening.  During this phase, kinetic energy is absorbed and stored in the tendons of the muscle structure to be used during the stretch reflex.

2)   Isometric phase: This is where the mass, or athlete, comes to a complete stop before being accelerated in a new direction. (This is actually governed by Sir Isaac Newton’s Laws of Motion. More on that and physics later.)

3)   Concentric phase: This is the acceleration of an athlete or mass. It is associated with muscle shortening.

As the adage goes, a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.  If your training program consists solely of methods that train the concentric portion of dynamic muscle action, your athletes are heading into the season with a chain consisting of one strong link and two weak links.  This book is designed to show you how to develop the other two phases of dynamic human movement with a periodization model that will make all three links strong and optimize the performance of your athletes. Remember that:




Now, for the very large majority of us, “triphasic” muscle action is not new. In fact, if you were to look at your college anatomy and physiology books it might be discussed within the very first chapter, but looking at your athlete’s strength programming I’d bet you’ll find it (or at least the isometric and eccentric portions) as scarce as tourists wearing shorts and a t-shirt during a Minnesota winter!  Sure you’ll find some isometric holds or eccentric tempos from time to time but rarely will entire phases be dedicated to developing these qualities.  And even more rare would be finding these qualities developed or emphasized within a sports medicine rehabilitation program!!


With close to 400 pages of information along with sample programs, Cal’s book leaves no preverbal stone unturned.  The addition of video links to each exercise in each sample program and video explanations and other recorded presentations throughout the book makes Triphasic Training one of the most complete training books I have ever read-watched-(and stole from)!


Whether you work in the performance arena and train elite athletes or a sports medicine clinic working with athletes looking to return to activity, Triphasic Training is a must read and will immediately impact each and every athlete you work with!


See Cal Dietz present at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar May 19-20th in Boston.

Register today before seats are sold out!


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Topics: BSMPG, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, boston hockey conference, athletic training books, Cal Dietz

BSMPG Welcomes Jose Fernendez from the UK to Boston for the 2012 Summer Seminar

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Jan 23, 2012 @ 07:01 AM

BSMPG is proud to announce Jose Fernendez as a speaker within the Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation Track for the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar, May 19-20, 2012 in Boston MA.


jose fernandez


Topic: Advanced Player Monitoring for Injury Reduction

Jose Fernandez graduated with Honours in Physical Education and Sports Science at the University of Madrid prior to obtaining a PostGradDip in Strength and Conditioning Training as applied to Young and Professional Athletes.

In 2007, Jose left his homeland in Spain and moved to the UK, where he has been working as external consultant in the field of Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation with some of the most important teams and organizations in the country like Manchester United FC, Chelsea FC, Manchester City FC, Newcastle United FC, Liverpool FC, Inter Milan FC, UK Athletics, SportScotland-Scottish Institute of Sport and Think Fitness-Football Injury and Performance Clinic, among others.

During the 2010/11, Jose returned to work in Basketball after accepting a job as Director of Strength and Conditioning at Mersey Tigers, a Liverpool based club competing in the Professional British Basketball League who became the first team in the history of the competition to win a treble in the same season. Jose still continues to collaborate with the team on a part time basis while reconciling his work in the consulting field.

Jose´s main areas of interest are “S&C training for Team Sports”, “Monitoring Training Load in Professional Sports” and “Application of new technologies for Injury Prevention and Performance Enhancement”.



Famously uttered by Sir Isaac Newton,

“If I can see further than anyone else, it is only because I am standing on the shoulders of giants.”

In 2011 BSMPG invited the titans of Sports Medicine and Performance to Boston for the largest conference of its kind, and many attendees left asking the question, "how could you ever top that speaker line-up?" Well, we did. BSMPG is proud to announce May 19-20, 2012 as the selected date for Sports Medicine and Strength professionals to desend upon Boston MA for another monster conference!

So how could we ever top last year's speaker set?

Let's just say that we asked last year's speakers who they wanted to hear and we got em!

Stay tuned over the next few weeks as we reveal our entire 2012 speaker set. As we did last year, this seminar will be divided into three distinct educational tracks including a Hockey focus, a Basketball Focus and a clear Sports Medicine/Rehabilitation Track with Keynote Speakers throughout the weekend bringing each track together for common lectures. Attendees may choose to stay within one track throughout the entire weekend or mix and match to meet their educational needs. Remember to save the date now - you won't want to miss another great summer seminar presented by BSMPG.

May 19-20, 2012 - Boston MA. Complete details coming soon!


Remember to Save the Date for the BSMPG 2012 Summer Seminar - May 19-20th in Boston MA.


A limited number of seats still remain for our DNS "A" course. Sign up now before the last seat is gone!

Topics: BSMPG, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, boston hockey conference

Happy Holidays from the BSMPG Family

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Dec 23, 2011 @ 07:12 AM



BSMPG wishes you and yours all the best this holiday season. 

Happy Holidays and Happy New Year!


Remember: Save the date for our 2012 Summer Seminar -- May 19-20 in Boston MA.

Also: A few seats still remain for the DNS course, March 30-April 1st, 2012.  Sign up before this course is full!



Topics: basketball conference, BSMPG, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit

BSMPG Releases a Second DVD Set From This Summer's Seminar!

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Oct 28, 2011 @ 07:10 AM


BSMPG announces another opportunity to hear the Giants in Sports Medicine and Performance from the 2011 BSMPG summer seminar, "Standing On The Shoulders Of Giants".  Watch presentations from Tom Myers' Intensive Track Lecture, Cal Dietz's presentation from the Hockey Specific Track along with Mark Toomey & Dr. John DiMuro's presentation from the Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation Track.





This 3-DVD set contains four hours of Sports Medicine and Performance information and is the perfect holiday gift for those looking to improve the health and performance services that they provide.

Click HERE for complete details. 

Interested in more lectures from this seminar? Click HERE to learn more about additional lectures from Tom Myers, Clare Frank and Charlie Weingroff.




DNS Course "A" is coming to Boston in the spring of 2012. Learn more by clicking HERE. This course is limited to 30 individuals and is sure to fill up fast so register today!!

Topics: basketball conference, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit