Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group, LLC Blog

Jeff Cubos Talks Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization : Filling the Gaps

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Apr 9, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

by Jeff Cubos


It’s been over a year since I first began the Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization program. Since that initial “A” course, my clinical thought process has expanded exponentially through following up with the “B” and “C” courses, my privileged opportunity to visit Motol in Prague, and the day to day reflections of my current practice.

Well recently, I had the privilege of taking part in another DNS A course that was put forth by Michael Maxwell of Somatic Senses and taught by Alena Kobesova and Brett Winchester. This particular experience was quite special for me because not only was it local (hence no flight costs), but it provided me with the opportunity to share my experiences to date with many of my friends and colleagues who attended the course…including my wife.

I would say however, that the most beneficial aspect of being present was that it afforded me the opportunity to “fill in the gaps”.



Continue to read this article by Jeff Cubos by clicking HERE

Meet Jeff Cubos and other top therapists and strength coaches as attendees at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar.

Register today before seats are filled!!


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Topics: BSMPG, athletic training conference, Craig Liebenson, Charlie Weingroff, boston hockey conference, Cal Dietz, Jeff Cubos, Barefoot in Boston, Dan Boothby, Clare Frank, DNS course, barefoot training

DNS Course in Boston a Huge Success!!

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Apr 2, 2012 @ 07:04 AM

This past weekend, BSMPG hosted Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization Course "A" in Boston. 


This sold out event featured Clare Frank (pictured below) and Marcela Safarova (from the Czech Republic) as course instructors and was a huge hit!  


Interested about attending a future DNS course?


Read more about the DNS approach below as well as future opportunities both within the BSMPG network and offerings through Craig Liebenson.



DNS course clare frank



Click HERE to read more about DNS and about Craig Liebenson's experiences with DNS.


If you missed out on this exciting course work, don't worry! BSMPG is already making plans for another course "A" offering next year as well as a course "B" for those looking to advance their skills in DNS.


Can't wait for next year to learn more about DNS? No problem - Craig Liebenson is offering course work for both Sports Medicine professionals as well as fitness and strength professionals in the near future.  Click HERE to learn more about these exciting opportunities.


See Craig Liebenson lecture in Boston this May 19-20 as he presents both a Keynote presentation at the annual 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar as well as a breakout session the day following.  For complete details on Craig's presentation as well as a complete list of presenters and event details click HERE.  

Seats are limited for this event and are certain to sell out again this year.


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Topics: Art Horne, basketball conference, BSMPG, Craig Liebenson, boston hockey conference, Andrea Hudy, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Alan Grodin, Dr. DiMuro, Clare Frank, dynamic neuromuscular stabilization

Interview with Mark Toomey and Dr. John DiMuro - 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar Presenters

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, Mar 28, 2012 @ 07:03 AM

Co-Presenters at the 2011 BSMPG Summer Seminar, Dr. John DiMuro and Mark Toomey return to Boston in May for the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar for a series of lectures that are sure to provide attendees with a number of monumental "ah-ha" moments as they show with fluoroscopy EXACTLY what is happening during exercises in both your rehabilitation and performance training programs.  

The difference between what you thought was happening during simple exercises and what is actually occuring at each joint will have you thinking twice before you prescribe your next exercise program or therapeutic intervention.


Click HERE to listen to a recent interview with Dr. DiMuro and Mark Toomey on



Mark Toomey


Dr John DiMuro DO, MBA

Dr. DiMuro is a Board Certified Anesthesiologist and Pain Medicine expert who specializes in advanced interventional pain treatments for all types of pain conditions. He grew up in central New Jersey prior to attending medical and business school in Philadelphia . He has an M.B.A. in health care management from St. Joseph 's University and completed his internship at the Tampa Bay Heart Institute. He was chief resident during his Anesthesiology residency at Georgetown University in Washington , D.C. prior to completing a pain medicine fellowship at the world-renowned Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City . He currently serves on the Carson Tahoe Hospital Cancer Committee. He continues to work in private practice and lectures nationally for the Kimberly Clark Company and Boston Scientific.

Mark Toomey, Sr RKC, CSCS

Mark Toomey is a fitness instructor from Reno , Nevada . He serves as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) in fitness and conditioning for the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. He is the Director of Operations for Dragon Door Publications, a producer of cutting edge material on strength and conditioning and acts as a Senior Instructor for the RKC, the first and largest entity specializing in kettlebell and body weight exercise instruction. Mark is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and a certified CK-FMS practitioner.


Be sure to register for the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar today before they sell out!

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Topics: basketball conference, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, Craig Liebenson, boston hockey conference, Bruce Williams, Cal Dietz, Bill Knowles, Dan Boothby, barefoot running

Triphasic Training: A Systematic Approach to Elite Speed and Explosive Strength

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Mar 23, 2012 @ 07:03 AM


Cal Dietz



by Art Horne 

I recently travelled to Minnesota to visit a few friends and spend time with the strength coaches from both the Minnesota Timberwolves and the University of Minnesota.  If you’ve ever been to Minnesota you know that packing a winter jacket is a must and this trip this was clearly not the exception!


My first stop was with Cal Dietz from the University of Minnesota.  I’ve mentioned Cal’s new book, Triphasic Training a number of times before, but sitting down with Cal in front of a whiteboard and reviewing his training philosophy gave me a new appreciation and a monumental “ah ha” moment for the three phases of muscle action.



Excerpt from Cal’s book: Preface p. VII





That one simple sentence is what ties every sport together and allows all athletes to be trained using the same method, yielding the same results.  It is what this entire book is about.  Understanding the physiologic nature of muscle action taking place during dynamic movements gives you, the coach, a foundational training method that can be applied to every sport.  Couple this method with a periodization schedule that can be altered to fit with any training time frame and you have the tri-phasic undulating block method.


In a very brief and basic explanation that will be expanded upon at length in later chapters, the triphasic nature of all dynamic movement can be broken down into three phases:

1)   Eccentric phase: This is the deceleration or lowering portion of the movement.  It is associated with muscle lengthening.  During this phase, kinetic energy is absorbed and stored in the tendons of the muscle structure to be used during the stretch reflex.

2)   Isometric phase: This is where the mass, or athlete, comes to a complete stop before being accelerated in a new direction. (This is actually governed by Sir Isaac Newton’s Laws of Motion. More on that and physics later.)

3)   Concentric phase: This is the acceleration of an athlete or mass. It is associated with muscle shortening.

As the adage goes, a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.  If your training program consists solely of methods that train the concentric portion of dynamic muscle action, your athletes are heading into the season with a chain consisting of one strong link and two weak links.  This book is designed to show you how to develop the other two phases of dynamic human movement with a periodization model that will make all three links strong and optimize the performance of your athletes. Remember that:




Now, for the very large majority of us, “triphasic” muscle action is not new. In fact, if you were to look at your college anatomy and physiology books it might be discussed within the very first chapter, but looking at your athlete’s strength programming I’d bet you’ll find it (or at least the isometric and eccentric portions) as scarce as tourists wearing shorts and a t-shirt during a Minnesota winter!  Sure you’ll find some isometric holds or eccentric tempos from time to time but rarely will entire phases be dedicated to developing these qualities.  And even more rare would be finding these qualities developed or emphasized within a sports medicine rehabilitation program!!


With close to 400 pages of information along with sample programs, Cal’s book leaves no preverbal stone unturned.  The addition of video links to each exercise in each sample program and video explanations and other recorded presentations throughout the book makes Triphasic Training one of the most complete training books I have ever read-watched-(and stole from)!


Whether you work in the performance arena and train elite athletes or a sports medicine clinic working with athletes looking to return to activity, Triphasic Training is a must read and will immediately impact each and every athlete you work with!


See Cal Dietz present at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar May 19-20th in Boston.

Register today before seats are sold out!


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Topics: BSMPG, athletic training conference, boston hockey summit, boston hockey conference, athletic training books, Cal Dietz

Reading From Last Week

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, Mar 21, 2012 @ 06:03 AM

Recommended readings from this past week in Sports Medicine and Performance.


Enjoy! Remember to register for the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar, May 19-20 in Boston MA.  Seats are limited.


The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself 


Vitamin D and Athletic Performance  


Variability in Leg Muscle Power and Hop Performance After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction    

Effect of warm-up exercise on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction        



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Topics: basketball conference, athletic training conference, boston hockey conference, Barefoot in Boston

Plantar Sided Foot Pain, Going Barefoot and Simple Exercises by Jeff Cubos

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Mar 16, 2012 @ 07:03 AM

I recently took part in a workshop where both manual and instrument assisted soft tissue therapy were heavily promoted as the gold standard in plantar sided foot pain presentations. While certainly such therapeutic interventions as Active Release Techniques and Graston Technique may act as positive adjuncts in the management of such cases, I often find myself using exercise interventions with relatively more rapid results. As always, patient management should always be context dependent but this is what I’m finding.

Interestingly, when therapists do consider exercise interventions, heel raises/lowers off stairs seem to be the “exercise of choice”. Often such presentations are acute or “hot” and based on Craig Purdam’s work on tendinopathies, such exercises may be too advanced for significant progress to be made.

Now before I introduce some alternative exercises, I’d like to address the “One Toe Syndrome”. Patients with plantar sided foot pain, especially women for some reason, often present with this “syndrome”. They may indeed have five toes, as most of us do, but if you look closely the toes actually function as one unit rather than five individual units.


The "One Toe" Syndrome

Continue to read this article by Jeff Cubos by clicking HERE.




Remember to Save the Date for the BSMPG 2012 Summer Seminar - May 19-20th in Boston MA.

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Topics: athletic training conference, boston hockey conference, barefoot strength training, Jeff Cubos, Barefoot in Boston

John Berardi Talks Sports Nutrition

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Mar 12, 2012 @ 07:03 AM


Check out three of John Berardi's previous nutrition articles here:








Remember to Save the Date for the BSMPG 2012 Summer Seminar - May 19-20th in Boston MA. Registration is open but seats are limited!

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Topics: basketball conference, athletic training conference, John Berardi, boston hockey conference

BSMPG 2012 Summer Seminar Agenda Finalized!

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Mar 9, 2012 @ 07:03 AM

In 2011, BSMPG invited the titans of Sports Medicine and Performance to Boston for the largest conference of its kind, and many attendees left asking the question, "how could you ever top that speaker line-up?"

Well, we did.

BSMPG is proud to announce May 19-20, 2012 as the selected date for Sports Medicine and Strength professionals to desend upon Boston MA for another monster conference! So how could we ever top last year's speaker set? Let's just say that we asked last year's speakers who they wanted to hear and we got em! As we did last year, this seminar will be divided into three distinct educational tracks including a Hockey focus, a Basketball Focus, and a clear Sports Medicine/Rehabilitation Track with Keynote Speakers throughout the weekend bringing each track together for common lectures. Attendees may choose to stay within one track throughout the entire weekend or mix and match to meet their educational needs. Remember to save the date now - you won't want to miss another great summer seminar presented by BSMPG.


Date: May 19-20, 2012

Location: Boston MA. Campus of Northeastern University

Agenda: Click HERE to view

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Get to know Keynote Speaker at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar, Craig Liebenson below in an interview by Everything Basketball:





dunk shot 

 Craig Liebenson 


How and why did you get into the field of Sports Medicine / chiropractic studies?

Mainly because I felt strongly an allopathic orientation to health & disease was too focused on the disease end of the spectrum and not enough on health & wellness.

Who in the field has influenced or helped you the most? Influenced your philosophy? What have you learned from them that you can you share?

Karel Lewit & Vladimiir Janda the great Czech neurologists have had by far the greatest influence on me. They have taught me that functional pathology of the motor system holds the key to reducing pain, preventing injury & enhancing performance. Their approach focuses in the broadest sense on all structures of the locomotor system (skin, fascia, muscle, tendon, ligament, and joint). What is most important are the faulty movement patterns that are "memorized" in the CNS and lead to tissue strain.

Name 3-5 books everyone helping basketball athletes should have in their library and why?

  • Stuart McGill - because it gives a ‘no-nonsene' approach to spinal biomechanics 101. Sadly a horribly misunderstood subject
  • Karel Lewit - Musculoskeletal Medicine - it gives the foundation for an integrated approach to manipulation & rehabilitation
  • Joanne Elphinston - Stability, Sport and Performance Movement - great illustrations of stable & unstable movements
  • Vern Gambetta - Any of his books - because he know how to coach better than anyone else

What is the last book you read and why?

Continue reading this interview by clicking HERE



Topics: basketball training programs, athletic training conference, Craig Liebenson, boston hockey conference, DNS course

Advanced Athlete Monitoring For Injury Reduction at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, Mar 7, 2012 @ 07:03 AM

Join Jose Fernandez and other top Sports Medicine and Sports Performance professionals from across the world as they desend on Boston this May 19th-20th for the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar.  Choose from a number of specific learning tracks or mix and match to suit your learning needs.  Keynote speakers throughout the weekend include Dr. Craig Liebenson, Chris Powers, Alan Grodin, Irving Schexnayder, and Bill Knowles. 

Register today for this once in a lifetime event! Seats are limited!


BSMPG Summer Seminar


        BSMPG Summer Seminar


Boston Sport Medicine and Performance Conference

Advanced Athlete Monitoring for Injury Reduction

Jose Fernandez



Professional athletes are experts at what they do, regardless how many S&C sessions they perform a week, they either have the quality to average 20 points per night or they don´t. From a physical perspective, coaches need to make sure their athletes are healthy and available to play every night. A healthy professional athlete should be capable to display a good performance just by being healthy. Everything else that can be achieved with training is a plus.

In a league where teams have to play 3-4 games a week and take more than 90 flights per season, time is limited for coaches to carry out physical training sessions with their players. A training program must be precise, specific and adjusted to the individual needs of each athlete. Coaches should focus on maintaining and reducing the loss of training adaptations throughout the season while enhancing the recovery and regeneration strategies.

At this year´s BSMPG Conference, I will be presenting ideas on how to objectively profile athletes attending to their neuromuscular characteristics and type of muscle fiber predominance. Continuing with this neuromuscular approach to athlete monitoring, innovative ways to quantify effects and duration of the training and treatments will be discussed. Being able to control the rate at which each muscle gains and looses activation after a training session or how exactly certain therapy treatment affects the functionality of any muscle group is crucial if we want to schedule training actions at the right moment, with the aim to maximize the physical performance and minimize risk of injury during the competition.

From an injury prevention perspective, new concepts to evaluate athlete´s readiness to train and assessment of change in muscle response induced by training will also be suggested, with a clear focus on practicality and applicability.

Aiming for maximal performance is a complex task. The purpose of my presentation is to offer some insight into the analysis of an athlete´s neuromuscular condition and how this can help coaches optimize training in an objective, reliable and time saving manner.

I look forward to seeing you at the BSMPG Conference in May!



Topics: Art Horne, basketball performance, BSMPG, athletic training conference, boston hockey conference, Logan Schwartz, Andrea Hudy, Bruce Williams, Mark Toomey, Cal Dietz, Alan Grodin, Joel Jamieson, Dan Boothby, Jose Fernandez

Top Reads from Last Week - BSMPG

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Feb 27, 2012 @ 07:02 AM

Retention of Movement Pattern Changes After a Lower Extremity Injury Prevention Program Is Affected by Program Duration



Massage Therapy Attenuates Inflammatory Signaling After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.



Breathing and Low Back Pain: Is there a correlation?




Remember to Save the Date for the BSMPG 2012 Summer Seminar - May 19-20th in Boston MA.

Topics: basketball conference, athletic training conference, boston hockey conference, Barefoot in Boston