Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group, LLC Blog

Ben Prentiss joins 2014 BSMPG Summer Seminar Speaker List

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Tue, Dec 10, 2013 @ 09:12 AM

 

BSMPG is proud to announce Ben Prentiss as a speaker at the 2014 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 16-18th, 2014.  Last year was a sell out and the only difference this year will be us announcing a sell out a month in advance!  This will be one of the greatest performance and therapy seminars of all time!

Seriously, this will sell out - Registration will open January 1st, 2014.  Members of the BSMPG family will receive an opportunity to reserve their seat in advance - stay tuned for details. With speakers and attendees traveling from around the world, this seminar will close in record time.

Be sure to save the date and reserve your hotel room well in advance.

See you in Boston next May!!!  

 

prentiss

 

BEN PRENTISS  

SPONSORED BY:      

bsmpg

Strength and conditioning coach Ben Prentiss has been working with professional and Olympic hockey players for over 14 years. Ben's unique training system encompasses speed, strength, power, agility, and flexibility, along with body composition and nutrition. This approach has allowed athletes to achieve their personal goals and reach optimal physical shape. Ben opened his own training facility, Bodytuning, twelve years ago in Darien, CT. Bodytuning, home of Prentiss Hockey Performance, is a 2,000 square foot gym containing unique equipment that has helped produce three Stanley Cup winners, NHL All-Stars, a Hart Trophy winner, and a Hobey Baker finalist .

Over the years Ben has trained professional hockey players on 21 of 30 NHL teams as well as members of the OHL, QMJHL, USHL, AHL, DEL (German Ice Hockey League), NLA (National League A Switzerland), FEL (Finnish Elite League), NCAA, Olympics, and World Championships. Ben's off-season training program has been recommended by coaches, advisors, and agents. Over two dozen media outlets have featured Ben's training techniques with his athletes, including Sports Illustrated, Men's Health, Fox Sports, and The Hockey News. 

 

Registration opens on January 1st, 2014 - Book your Hotel in Boston Today

 

TMG

Topics: BSMPG Summer Seminar, Ben Prentiss

BSMPG Summer Seminar: Where Leaders Learn

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Fri, Nov 22, 2013 @ 07:11 AM

 

 

“In music it isn’t the notes themselves that create the music for there are similar groupings of notes in many pieces.  It is the space between the notes or the silence between the notes that creates the differences between musical pieces.”

- Randy Huntington, 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar Speaker on Training and Recovery

 

 

Save the Date: May 16-18, 2014

BSMPG: Where Leaders Learn

Registration Opens January 1, 2014

 

New Call to action TMG

 

Topics: BSMPG Summer Seminar, Ben Prentiss, Boo Schexnayder, Randall Huntington

Stress: It's Not What You Think

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, Nov 6, 2013 @ 07:11 AM

Is it stress or the way you handle it that will kill you?

 

 

Save The Date: May 16-18, 2014

BSMPG Summer Seminar

TMG

 

 

Topics: BSMPG Summer Seminar, Ben Prentiss, Boo Schexnayder

The Future is Here - BSMPG Summer Seminar 2014

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Oct 28, 2013 @ 07:10 AM

 

 

BSMPG is proud to announce Eric Oetter as a speaker within the popular Sports Fusion Track at the 2014 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 16-18th, 2014.  Last year was a sell out and the only difference this year will be us announcing a sell out a month in advance!  This will be one of the greatest performance and therapy seminars of all time!

Seriously, this will sell out - Registration will open January 1st, 2014.  Members of the BSMPG family will receive an opportunity to reserve their seat in advance - stay tuned for details. With speakers and attendees traveling from around the world, this seminar will close in record time.

Be sure to save the date and reserve your hotel room well in advance.

See you in Boston next May!!!

 

Eric Oetter

 

ERIC OETTER

SPONSORED BY:

 

ucan

 

 

Eric is an author, speaker, coach, and student, currently pursuing his DPT from the Emory University School of Medicine.

Following an injury-shortened athletic career at Georgia Tech, Eric has coached a diverse clientele at two of the top gyms in the country, Indianapolis Fitness and Sports Training and Cressey Performance. He has since consulted with coaches in the Big Ten and was recently named one of the Top 25 Fitness Industry Rising Stars by FitnessBusinessInterviews.com.

Eric champions the principles of the Postural Restoration Institute and has been formally trained in the methodologies of DNS, FMS/SFMA, and PRRT, among others.

His articles can be found on EricCressey.com, 8weeksout.com, and in Fighting Fit magazine.

 

 

 

CRESSEY 

From Eric Cressey

"Eric Oetter is one of the brightest young minds in the world of health and human performance. He's incredibly well versed in a number of different realms, making him not only a great coach, but also a great teacher. Don't miss an opportunity to see him present; you'll regret it."

 

MIKEROBERTSON

From Mike Robertson

"It's rare that I've met someone at his young age that has the intellect and critical thinking skills to take what's taught to him, critically analyze it, and then make it his own.

Don't let his age fool you - Eric is wise beyond his years, and someone I expect to lead our industry for many years to come."

 

 

BILLHARTMAN

From Bill Hartman

"Eric is one of the sharpest minds in the industry with a broad understanding of the movement and sports sciences. Those of us who have had to opportunity to work with him directly already know that he will be one of the big names in a few short years. Credit Art Horne for knowing where to find the newest top talent and for providing Eric a forum to share his knowledge of the complex subject matter of human performance."

 

Registration for the 2014 BSMPG Summer Seminar opens January 1, 2014

BSMPG: Where Leaders Learn

 

 

New Call to action TMG

Topics: Eric Oetter, BSMPG Summer Seminar, Ben Prentiss, Boo Schexnayder

Your Anatomy Teacher Was Wrong - Again!

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, Oct 23, 2013 @ 07:10 AM

Still Stretching the IT Band?

 

vasti.lat

 

"Our anatomical findings confirmed that the ITB is in fact a thickening of the facia lata, which completely envelopes the leg. In all cases it was connected to the femur along the linea aspera from the greater tronchanter (by the intermuscular septum) to, and including, the lateral epicondyle of the femur by coarse fibrous bands. We failed to demonstrate a bursa interposed between the ITB and distal lateral femur on a single cadaver. The TFL muscle was completely enveloped in fascia, its origin formed by fascia lata arising from the iliac crest. TFL inserted directly into ITB, the latter structure behaving as an elongated tendon insertion of TFL. A substantial portion of Gluteus Maximus inserted directly into ITB, independently of the portion of muscle that inserts into the greater trochanter."

p. 583

 

“Many of the traditional treatments for ITBS are based on the presence of a bursa between the ITB and the LFC, an ability to stretch the ITB, and the development of friction between the ITB and the LFC due to transverse motion. Our findings challenge these anatomical and pathological principles. Two of the common treatments of ITBS focus on treating local inflammation of the distal ITB and putative ‘‘bursa’’ and stretching the ITB (Noble, 1980; Barber & Sutker, 1992; Fredericson & Weir, 2006). The effectiveness of these two modalities should be questioned given the lack of support for the presence of a lateral bursa and the low magnitude and disparate strain occurring during stretching and MVC found in this study. In regard to treatment of the ‘‘bursa’’ this routinely utilizes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or corticosteroid injection in the belief that a bursitis or local inflammation is the basis of the condition (Barber & Sutker, 1992). Our gross anatomical studies failed to demonstrate a bursa interposed between the ITB and distal lateral femur on a single cadaver. These findings correlate closely with the works of Fairclough et al. (2006, 2007), who have suggested that a richly innervated and vascularised loose connective tissue (containing pressure-sensing pacinian corpuscles), represents the pain generating structure in the area. This is also suggested by the surgical specimens and imaging findings previously discussed (Orava et al., 1991; Nishimura et al., 1997). Local inflammation in the area may be related to compression of this connective tissue (Fairclough et al., 2006).”

p. 585

 

“Our anatomical studies also highlighted some important structural characteristics central to understanding the difficulties in stretching the ITB. The longitudinal and firm attachment (0.3mm average thickness) of the ITB to the full length of the femur means that the potential for physiological lengthening is limited. This would appear at odds with a number of authors, which have stretched (Yinen, 1997; Fredericson et al., 2002), and even quantified, the lengthening of the ITB (Fredericson et al., 2002). This is likely to represent an apparent, rather than true lengthening, related to the lengthening of TFL rather than the ITB itself.”

p. 585

 

Falvey EC, et al. Iliotibial band syndrome: an examination of the evidence behind a number of treatment options. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010:20:580-587.

 

 

 

Registration for the 2014 BSMPG Summer Seminar opens January 1, 2014

BSMPG: Where Leaders Learn

 

 

New Call to action TMG

 

Topics: Charlie Weingroff, BSMPG Summer Seminar, Ben Prentiss, Boo Schexnayder, Cal Dietz

Boo Knows BSMPG

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Oct 14, 2013 @ 07:10 AM

 

boo

 

Boo Knows BSMPG

BSMPG is proud to announce the return of Irving "Boo" Schexnayder as a keynote speaker at the 2014 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 16-18th, 2014.  Last year was a sell out and the only difference this year will be us announcing a sell out a month in advance!  This will be one of the greatest performance and therapy seminars of all time!

Seriously, this will sell out - Registration will open January 1st, 2014.  Members of the BSMPG family will receive an opportunity to reserve their seat in advance - stay tuned for details.  With speakers and attendees traveling from around the world, this seminar will close in record time.

Be sure to save the date and reserve your hotel room well in advance.

See you in Boston next May!!!

 

Irving "Boo" Schexnayder is regarded internationally as one of the leading authorities in training design. He, as co-founder of SAC, brings 33 years of experience in the coaching and consulting fields to the organization.

Most noted for his 12 years as a member of the Track and Field coaching staff at LSU. Schexnayder, who coached collegiately at Louisiana-Lafayette and Blinn Junior College prior to arriving at LSU, placed quite an imprint on the collegiate track and field scene. Regarded as one of the world’s premier field event coaches, he was the mastermind behind 19 NCAA Champions during his collegiate coaching career. He was a part of 12 NCAA Championship teams and a pair of Juco National titles, as well as developing a host of conference champions and All-Americans.

Schexnayder has also been a prominent figure on the international scene, having coached triple jumper Walter Davis to multiple World Championships, and long jumper John Moffitt to a silver medal at the 2004 Olympics in Athens. He also tutored former US Long Jump Champ Brian Johnson, Miguel Pate, ranked 6th in the world in 2008, and US Indoor Champ Jeremy Hicks. He has coached 10 Olympians, and has served on coaching staffs for Team USA to the 2003 Pan Am Games in Santo Domingo, the 2006 World Junior Championships in Beijing, and was the Jumps Coach for Team USA at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.

 

BSMPG: Where Leaders Learn

Thank you to our Sponsors

 

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 Watch Boo at the 2012 BSMPG Summer Seminar 

Topics: BSMPG Summer Seminar, Ben Prentiss, Boo Schexnayder

BSMPG 2014 Summer Seminar - Patrick Ward Added To Speaker List

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Oct 7, 2013 @ 07:10 AM

BSMPG is proud to announce Patrick Ward as the second speaker added to the 2014 BSMPG Summer Seminar speaker list - May 16-18th, 2014. Last year was a sell out and the only difference this year will be us announcing a sell out a month in advance!  This will be one of the greatest performance and therapy seminars of all time!

Seriously, this will sell out - Registration will open January 1st, 2014.  Members of the BSMPG family will receive an opportunity to reserve their seat in advance - stay tuned for details.  With speakers and attendees traveling from around the world, this seminar will close in record time.

Be sure to save the date and reserve your hotel room well in advance.

See you in Boston next May!!!

 

Patrick Ward

 

PATRICK WARD

Strength & Conditioning Coach / Massage Therapist

nike

SPONSORED BY:

 

normatec

 

From 2006 to 2012, Patrick Ward ran his own sports performance training facility in Phoenix, AZ, where he worked with athletes across a variety of sports, including golf, volleyball, football, soccer and other world-class athletes training for international competition. Patrick earned a Master of Exercise Science from California University of Pennsylvania in 2007, holds NSCA and CSCS certifications and is a licensed massage therapist. Currently Patrick works within the Nike Sports Research Lab in Portland, OR, where he works with some of the greatest athletes in the world and helps Nike collect sports performance insights.

Patrick maintains an active blog, www.optimumsportsperformance.com, where he frequently writes about his thoughts and ideas in the world of health and human performance.

 

New Call to action

Topics: Patrick Ward, Neil Rampe, BSMPG Summer Seminar, Ben Prentiss, Fergus Connolly

BSMPG 2014 Summer Seminar - Neil Rampe - Arizona Diamondbacks

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Sep 30, 2013 @ 07:09 AM

BSMPG is proud to announce Neil Rampe as the first speaker added to the 2014 BSMPG Summer Seminar speaker list - May 16-18th, 2014. Last year was a sell out and the only difference this year will be us announcing a sell out a month in advance!  This will be one of the greatest performance and therapy seminars of all time!

Seriously, this will sell out - Registration will open January 1st, 2014.  Members of the BSMPG family will receive an opportunity to reserve their seat in advance - stay tuned for details.  With speakers and attendees traveling from around the world, this seminar will close in record time.

Be sure to save the date and reserve your hotel room well in advance.

See you in Boston next May!!!

 

BSMPG

 

NEIL RAMPE

Manual Therapist for the Arizona Diamondbacks

BSMPG

SPONSORED BY:

 

INSIDETRACKER

 

Neil Rampe is currently in his sixth year as the Manual Therapist for Major League Baseball’s Arizona Diamondbacks. Neil’s education includes an AA in Personal Training as well as BS in Athletic Training and Physical Education with an emphasis in Strength & Conditioining from the University of Findlay. He went on to receive his M.Ed. in Applied Kinesiology with a Sport and Exercise Science emphasis from the University of Minnesota where he served as a strength & conditioning coach in the golden gopher athletic department. Neil then served as a certified athletic trainer at the Boulder Center for Sports Medicine in Boulder, CO. Neil then spent five years at The University of Arizona where he served as the Associate Dierctor, Performance Enhancement. Neil is a Certified Athletic Trainer through the NATABOC, a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist through the NSCA, a Licensed Massage Therapist through the AMTA and NCBTMB. Neil is also a Certified Active Release Techniques provider, Functional Range Release provider and has received his Performance Enhancement Specialist and Corrective Exercise Specialist advanced specializations through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Neil is also a C level DNS practitioner the The Prague School of Rehabilitation and a PRT (Postural Restoration Trained) through The Postural Restoration Institute. Over the past 14 years Neil has had the opportunity to consult and work with a number of elite athletes at the high school collegiate, olympic and professional ranks in the areas of rehabilitation, therapy and performance enhancement.

 

New Call to action

 

 

Topics: Patrick Ward, Neil Rampe, BSMPG Summer Seminar, Ben Prentiss, Fergus Connolly

Jumping High: External Focus More Important than Strength?

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Wed, Jan 16, 2013 @ 07:01 AM

 

Vertec

 

from Attention and Motor Skill Learning – Gabriele Wulf

“Zachry had participants perform a jump-and-reach task using a Vertec measurement device (see photo).  Participants were instructed to jump straight up and touch the highest rung on the Vertec they could reach with the tips of their fingers.  Each participant performed five trials under one of three conditions: control, internal focus, and external focus.  For the control condition, no additional focus instruments were given.  Under the internal focus condition, participants were instructed to concentrate on the tips of their fingers.  Under the external focus condition they were instructed to concentrate on the object to be touched, that is, the rungs of the Vertec.

Participants indeed reached higher rungs when they adopted the external focus (on average 4.79 rungs) compared to the internal focus (4.12 rungs) or when they received no attentional focus instructions (4.10 rungs).  Also the time they spent in the air was longer under the external (0.491 s) than under the internal focus (0.477 s) or the control condition (0.478 s)  Thus a change in the focus of attention significantly affected reach height: Focusing on the object to be touched resulted in more effective performance than did focusing on the finger with which the object was to be touched.  Perhaps most interestingly, instructing the participants to adopt an external focus increased jump height above and beyond what participants achieved under “normal” conditions (i.e., control conditions without instructions).  These results were recently replicated by Carolina Granados in my lab (Wulf, Zachry, Granados, & Dufek, 2006, Experiment 2).  In addition to looking at reach height, Granados calculated the displacement of participants’ center of mass during the jumps.  Interestingly, she found not only the greatest reach heights under the external focus condition, but also greater vertical displacements of the center of mass (0.51 cm) compared to those in the internal focus (0.47 cm) and control conditions (0.47 cm).

These findings might seem surprising given that one might expect the jump height to be determined mainly (although not exclusively) by the participant’s strength.  Yet we also know, for example, that the coordination between and within muscles influences maximum force production as well (Hollmann & Hettinger, 2000).  It is possible tha an external focus optimizes those coordination patterns.  While we have to await further research to find out how exactly the attentional focus instructions affected jump height, the findings of this study could have implications for sports in which maximum forces must be generated in a short periods of time (e.g., high jump, long jump, pole vault, basketball layup).  In those cases, focusing on the target (e.g., the bar in the high jump) might also result in more effective performance than focusing on movement coordination or not focusing on anything in particular.” Pg 58-59

 

“The studies we have reviewed in this chapter confirm the anecdotal observation (in windsurfing) that the performance of motor skills seems to be more effective if one focuses on the effects one’s movements have on the environment rather than on the movements themselves.  The results from studies using various laboratory tasks as well as sport skills provide converging evidence for the advantage of instructions that induce an external relative to an internal focus.  The benefits of an external focus appear to be even more pronounced if the movement effect occurs at a distance from the body, thus making it more easily distinguishable from the body movements that produced it.  Furthermore, this effect seems to be rather general and not dependent on individual preferences.  In fact, performers often notice immediate changes in their performance as a function of their focus of attention.  Importantly, the effects of adopting an external focus when practicing a skill is not just temporary, that is, present only when the individual adopts that focus; rather, these benefits are seen in the retention of the skill and in transfer to novel variations of the skill.” Pg 77

 

Focus your attention to the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar - Where the top Sports Medicine and Performance Professionals meet every year!

 

Sign Up before April 15, 2013 and enjoy our Early Bird Pricing!

 

Register for the 2013 BSMPG  Summer Seminar Today

 

Topics: Charlie Weingroff, Motor Control, BSMPG Summer Seminar, Ben Prentiss, Marco Cardinale, Marvin Chun, Fergus Connolly, Stuart McGill

Happy New Year from the BSMPG Family

Posted by Boston Sports Medicine and Performance Group on Mon, Dec 31, 2012 @ 07:12 AM

Wishing you and your family all the best this coming year.

 

BSMPG Summer Seminar

Make 2013 the year you take another step forward in your journey to becoming a leader in Sports Medicine and Performance Training by attending the 2013 BSMPG Summer Seminar - May 17 & 18th in Boston MA.

Sign up before the end of the day today and enjoy our 2012 seminar price!

 

Register for the 2013 BSMPG  Summer Seminar Today

Topics: Charlie Weingroff, Stu McGill, Kevin Neeld, Adriaan Louw, BSMPG Summer Seminar, Ben Prentiss, Bill Knowles, Marco Cardinale, Rob Butler, Bobby Alejo